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  5. "Αυτός πίνει το απόγευμα."

"Αυτός πίνει το απόγευμα."

Translation:He drinks in the afternoon.

January 6, 2017

23 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/spdl79
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  • 1543

Would αυτός πίνει στο απόγευμα be correct? I'm little bit puzzled as to how the 'in' gets worked into the sentence when there's just a standard definite article there.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/D_..
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  • 118

Good thinking - tough luck! I don't know why, but in never comes into play in these phrases in Greek, e.g. - Πότε φτάνεις; - Το πρωί/μεσημέρι/απόγευμα/βράδυ. It sounds like a verb object, but it's not!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mizinamo

A bit like "He will drink this evening" -- "this evening" just shows the time, it's not the thing which he will drink, nor do we say "at this evening" or "in this evening" :)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/spdl79
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  • 1543

Thanks both, much appreciated. That's another one for my big Word document of unexpected rules!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Kadmos_Thebes

By the way, the same is true with days, e.g. αυτός πίνει τη Δευτέρα, πίνει και το Σάββατο, αυτός πίνει κάθε Δευτέρα και Σάββατο. We don't put "on" there.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/spdl79
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Thank you Kadmos, that's really good to know too!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SauerTrout

απόγευμα... after the meal??


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mizinamo

Literally, yes.

It means "afternoon", though, as a fixed expression -- just as when you are fasting, the first meal when you break your fast is not called "breakfast" but instead only the first meal of the day.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/languagepotato

In English (just like in my native language (Dutch)), I would understand this sentence as implying 'He drinks alcoholic beverages in the afternoon'. Does it work the same in Greek?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/D_..
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  • 118

Yes it does, that's what I get from it too straight away without any further explanation.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Stergi3

It is like an adverb here. From the Ancient greek, it was so, i.e. "αι Μυροφόροι λίαν πρωί ελθούσαι...", an Easter hymn excerpt,(=the Myrrhbearers having come very early in the morning...) More: https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Myrrhbearers


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/LeonidTere2

Why "he drinks afternoon" wouldn't be right, please? http://prntscr.com/pdwa6p


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mizinamo

Why "he drinks afternoon" wouldn't be right, please?

Because in English, we say "in the afternoon" to indicates when something happens, not simply "afternoon" or "the afternoon".

So when you're translating from Greek to English, you have to insert a preposition because English expresses time differently from Greek.

Lingot to you for including a screenshot!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Alison336345

He drinks afternoons (plural) meaning he drinks in the afternoon could be a form of American english...


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/G.Georgopoulos

That would be a translation of its own in Greek as well: "...τα απογεύματα".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PauloMuffato

In other cases, could I say μετά γεύμα as well? I put it on google translator and it said "after a storm", what?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/D_..
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  • 118

If you want to say 'he drinks after the meal' then πίνει μετά το γεύμα is a valid translation. Note however that in μετά το γεύμα, το is not optional: the structure is μετά + article + noun.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Alison336345

The Greek voice clearly says "Αυτος πινει το απογευκο.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/D_..
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  • 118

I just checked it and it sounds fine - TTS, but fine. The -μα specifically is very clear, the -ευ- less so.
I am using headphones, maybe that helps?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AniOhevYayin

Some people are wondering about why the Greek doesn't have the preposition "in." That was new to me, too. This situation happens with languages: It's similar to the Spanish verb interesar, "to be interested in," for which there is no preposition added, e.g., me interesa beber en la tarde, "I'm interested in drinking in the afternoon." There are probably many examples from many languages one could add. At issue is that English works differently, in these cases requiring the preposition "in" where Greek and Spanish do not.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/spdl79
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It's not quite so straightforward. The preposition is needed with clock times and calendar dates, for example, you say Θα πάω στο κατάστημα στις 9:00. But other measures of time, like απογεύμα, δευτέρα, or χειμώνας, you don't need the σε. I think that trips a lot of learners up (including myself, especially a couple of years ago).

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