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  5. "The horse is perfect for it."

"The horse is perfect for it."

Translation:Das Pferd ist dazu perfekt.

February 18, 2013

35 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/VaterGut

I wrote, 'Dazu ist das Pferd perfekt.' Is this actually wrong?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Manny4us

What is with the position of "dazu"? These adverb placements are by far the hardest I came across.

Could I say "Das Pferd ist perfekt dazu."?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/arisplus

I dont see anything wrong with it. As long as you have the verb in the second position, the rest of the elements are pretty much interchangeable. Then again I am not a native speaker.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Kelvin277452

Duolingo accepts the answer "Das Pferd ist perfekt dazu"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AsaPillsbu

I put "dafür ist das Pferd perfekt“. It said I was wrong and should have said "Das Pferd ist dafür perfekt“... but I think mine is more correct. :(


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/nictheman

Reported as I got it wrong too.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/stephenbal4

I used dafür and got it right. But why dazu?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/TiddletheFiddle

I was wondering the same thing. I imagine the German could mean something more like, "The horse is perfect(ly suited) to it"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Markus8711

To fit/go with something is "passen zu". My guess is that if you're talking about the horse being a perfect fit, "passen" can be inferred and therefore 'dazu' works.

Someone might want to correct me though if this is wrong.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/septiros

Which one is common "Das Pferd ist perfekt dafür" or "Das Pferd ist dazu perfekt". Which would native say?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Jeremy_A

What is the difference in meaning between "Das Pferd ist dazu perfekt," and "Das Pferd ist perfekt fur es" ?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/aschneiter

It seems that the German für most often translates to for but not vice versa (so an English for would require some thinking). I read that a reason for that stems from the origin of für which traces back to mean: in front of - if you give away an object for someone, it would be placed in front of him/her.

Examples where für = for would, therefore, require retaining that meaning:

[1- For a "gift" intention] These chocolates are for (für) you i.e. intended for you (so the intention is for the chocolates to be placed in front of you for you).

[2- For a quantity] She bought it for (für) 10 euros i.e. the money was set aside with the intention to be placed in front of the seller? - this is perhaps forcing it (nevertheless one can use the English upfront as in upfront cash was set aside for the seller, at least in her mind not necessarily beforehand).

[3- For a time span] I must stay there for (für) a week i.e. again with the intention of giving away something (time, upfront) to stay at a place in this case.

In cases where you use for as in for some reason or "for X" in the sense of because of i.e. essentially suggesting a reason why or a purpose like the example sentence herein (The horse is perfect for it - a reason implied), then you would not usually use für. An exception might be if you use dafür, which I believe explicitly implies for that (reason) in certain cases.

I am not sure if this is consistent. A German wouldn't think twice about when to use für vs. zu / aus etc whenever we use for in English from what I understand. Here are some more examples:

We do it for money = Wir tun es für Geld (I guess this fits [2] - "for a quantity" case)

We do it for fun = Wir machen es aus Spass (Notice the difference with the first example)

For example = Zum Beispiel. (for a purpose)

For your information = Zu Ihrer Information (for a purpose)

Many animals die for this reason = viele Tiere sterben aus diesem Grund (more akin to out of these reasons, the English for here is not as [1], [2] or [3])

A gift for my brother = Ein Geschenk für meinen Bruder [1]

For sale = zu verkaufen (for a purpose)

For a given amount = Für eine gegebene Menge [2]


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/luis.urcia

such very well explained¡ Thanks


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/christian

The latter doesn't exist.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Jeremy_A

You mean it just doesn't make sense in German?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/christian

It's not something a native speaker would say.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/metliq

Yeah, but that is like one third of the phrases, so not really a justification. Especially when hovers don't remind you of the correct word to use.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Ampus_Questor

Take it you mean 'the last one', ie of more than two items; 'latter' is for two only.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AdamKean

You realise christian was replying to Jeremy_A's comment right?

What is the difference in meaning between "Das Pferd ist dazu perfekt," and "Das Pferd ist perfekt fur es" ?

That looks like two items to me.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/dremwr

Why cant you say "fur es" for "for it"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/stephenbal4

It would have to be "dafür". When you have a preposition and a pronoun that doesn't refer to person, you have to combine them into a da word.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AdrianJosh

right! I put 'das Pferd ist perfekt dafür' and was marked correct.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/stollgisao

Merkwürdige Übersetzung... Dieser Satz macht keinen richtifen Dinn. Ich würde sagen: Das Pferd ist perfekt dafür. Soll bedeuten: es ist perfekt dafür geeignet. "dazu" passt nicht. So steht es auch im Internet. dazu meint: dazu gehören. Z.B. Ich gehöre zu einer bestimmten Gruppe von Leuten.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/QuintanillaJon

Does the adverb generally go after the verb?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AnaSrsh

In this sentence, what's more usual to use? Dafür or Dazu? Could we also say "für das" and "zu da"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/smuris
  • 1235

"Dafür" is more common, I think. "Für das" would still be understood, "zu da" or "zu das" does not make sense in German.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/royalt213

Even though I had no idea how to answer this because I couldn't remember "dazu," I just felt that "Das Pferd ist perfekt für es" wasn't right. That's some kind of progress...right?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/TimurikSunakbaev

das Pferd ist vollkommen dazu, das soll angenommen werden


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/cacophonyforever

I hope there isn't a german equvilant of enumclaw


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/VaterGut

just to confirm my error: dafur is NOT possible here


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/VaterGut

sorry, i no longer remember the reason behind my comment. It seems like it may even have been a question - without a question mark, and to be honest I am as curious to know why as you...Hopefully someone will enlighten us.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/pankow

Why shouldn't it be correct? Pons gives dafuer as synonym to dazu (the 5th meaning http://de.pons.eu/dict/search/results/?q=dazu&l=deen&in=&lf=de ).


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mikka86

I just used 'dafuer' and it was accepted. VaterGut's response may have been rejected simply because it was spelt without the umlaut (or appropriate transliteration) - dafür

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