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  5. "Un lup mănâncă carne prăjită…

"Un lup mănâncă carne prăjită."

Translation:A wolf eats fried meat.

January 9, 2017

14 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SyntaxSocialist

Is no one going to talk about the fact that the wolves are eating fried meat??


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Sollihein

Lol, it's Duo universe; anything is possible! Anthromorphic animals doing things humans do etc :-)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/coats001

Maybe if it was stated that they fried the meat themselves?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/qwertybestie2007

Good 1 SyntaxSocialist


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Sollihein

so prăjită means fried but prăjitură is cupcake? are cupcakes fried? lol


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/razvan.marin

Right! I mean... you got the meanings right, but we don't usually fry them!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Sollihein

I'm curious about the derivation since it looks like they share the same root :-)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/razvan.marin

They do indeed have the same root. In fact, a prăji is the root of prăjitură.

It seems that a prăji means using fire (usually in fat) upon a food item to make it edible or to process it. So besides frying, it also has this deeper meaning which at some time in the past made it a good reason to label cupcakes as prăjturi. Meanwhile, with the development of modern food it seems to have lost its broader meaning.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Sollihein

Interestingly, I googled the word and the images that came up do not resemble cupcakes at all, but more like crumbles or squares. Still look delicious though. I'm sorry, I just love deserturi haha.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/razvan.marin

I think they used cupcake to differentiate them from tort (google images for it) which is also cake.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Michal_90

A little bit late, but I think I can answer this :) It seems to me, that this is one of many words of Slavic origin. Romanian sound j is pretty close to Czech ž or Polish ż. There is a word "pražit" (verb) or "pražený" (adjective) in Czech which means to roast/roasted (in the meaning of e.g. nuts, not meat). The same is in Polish (prażyć, prażony). In Slovak on the other hand the same word means "to fry".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/tummai

Its gotta be a werewolf


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mason_b1

How did the wolf fry the meat

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