https://www.duolingo.com/Cam_and_Alex

Syllabification

Cam_and_Alex
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Hej! I have just started Swedish today, and was wondering if the way the audio is recorded is authentic in its speaking. I have never heard a language with the syllables so harshly split apart, and it seems like a lot to me. Of course, if it is a deal of authenticity, I'll just have to adapt, but are the syllables really THAT defined in everyday speech? It sounds like "kv[I]nn[A]" and "dr[I]ck[ER]", and the such. Thank you for any help you can give!

1 year ago

8 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/Ifphigenia
Ifphigenia
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  • 1370

Having known several Swedes in real life and watched a fair bit of both Swedish television and films, I would say yes, the syllables are fully defined, unlike in English where we lazily slur our words. However, there are a lot of native Swedish speakers here and I'm sure one of them will give you a definitive answer.

Great language though, isn't it? :-))

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Cam_and_Alex
Cam_and_Alex
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So far, yes! Thank you for the tidbit of info! Yeah, I am used to lazier languages. Dutch can be very lazy sometimes and completely leave off vowels altogether when you're talking quickly =P

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Ifphigenia
Ifphigenia
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Well, if it helps, I found there were a lot of similarities between Swedish and both Scottish and Northern English dialect words, which made it ( from my point of view) the easiest tree I've done but then, I'm from the North of England and from a Scottish family. I suppose also, that I'm used to more defined languages as Italian (my best language) sounds every syllable and letter clearly.

Anyway, I'm no expert but if I can help at all, let me know. :-))

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Cam_and_Alex
Cam_and_Alex
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Thank you! =D

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Larry_the_Zebra
Larry_the_Zebra
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The audio is quite authentic. The syllables are highly defined and the vowels are VERY clear in Swedish. The Swedish Chef on the Muppets was no joke! ;-) Listen a bit....... http://www.surfmusic.de/country/sweden.html (Click on Radio 1)

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/germanwannabee

Swedish is what is called a pitch-accent language which means that the vowels of certain words will be accented in various ways which (in some cases) can change the meaning of the word. For an example, The word "AndEn" means "the spirit" but the word "Anden" means "the duck."

I found this video really helpful. I hope it helps you as well (it's actually made by a user here on duolingo.)

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Zmrzlina
Zmrzlina
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(Psst, you mean the words "anden" (sg. and) and "anden" (sg. ande). Anka is not ambiguous.)

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/germanwannabee

Many thanks for pointing that out. I edited it.

1 year ago
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