https://www.duolingo.com/wwishmd

Dilma . . . . . . . or Rousseff?

Clearly, Brazilian news media refer to the President as Dilma and not as Rousseff - but this seems strange in an English-speaking context, e.g. Dilma met Obama. Any views on the convention we should adopt on Duolingo? To avoid edit wars, I would suggest either might be OK, although I personally prefer Rousseff.

February 27, 2014

12 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/GuerraAmanda

Nobody calls her Rousseff here... If that's the way Americans call her Duo should accept it as an English answer, of course, but it's surely not used here xD

February 27, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/GuerraAmanda

Definitely not.

February 27, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/V.Junior

This is how we do, it is a cultural thing. Despite the fact that it seems non formal to call the president by the first name, in Brazil this point makes no diference. What makes the diference is the title if you want to be formal. Take a look. http://pt.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pronome_de_tratamento

February 28, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/gabrielrborges

Calling people by their surnames is not a thing here, regardless of rank. In formal settings (not journalistic settings), we use "pronomes de tratamento" (Vossa Excelência/Sua Excelência, the former being second person and the latter being third person).

May 8, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/Jandreslami

I think English speakers feel more comfortable with Rousseff, while us, Latin Americans prefer Dilma (e.g. the former president of Brazil was called by his nome "Lula")

February 28, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/my-two-cents

In the Dominican Republic presidents are not called by their first name. So even among Spanish speaking countries, there are differences. :-)

March 1, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/P.Vanderlind

hmm There is a reason for that. Don't you think calling someone by the family name makes you sound formal? Formality keeps people apart. If you were to run for the presidency, would you wanna give the impression you're far from the voters? Don't forget, the majority of Brazilians don't see themselves as formal people, and the president should represent the majority.

February 28, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/LucasVeiga974518

The main reason we do not call Dilma by her family name is because she is a woman. In Brazil women are virtually never called by their surnames, even female politicians (a heritage of centuries of patriarchy and sexism), however, most male politicians are called by their surnames, for example current president Jair Bolsonaro, which is always called Bolsonaro and not Jair, and also Michel Temer, which is always called Temer, not Michel. Although there are some exceptions like Ciro Gomes, who was candidate to the presidency of Brazil as Ciro, not Gomes, even being a man.

January 10, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/hburdon

I personally prefer Dilma, for no good linguistic reason, I just think the informality of it is charming. Perhaps the uploader or the first person to translate an article should make the decision and specify it in the discussion section (which is terribly underused).

February 28, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/evandroguaru

it is a cultural differences. In most countries is normal call someone in formal way with surname (Mr green, Ms Garcia, etc..). In Brazil in formal and informal way we call someone with a first name, in formal way we add only ' promones pessoal de tratamento '( Mr Carlos, Ms Marta, etc...)

June 13, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/LucasVeiga974518

One of the main reasons Dilma Rousseff is called by her first name is because she is a woman. In Brazil women are virtually never called by their surnames, even female politicians, we must remember that our society is still somewhats sexist and patriarchal, so it is not very "appropriate" to call a woman by her last name. However, when we refer to men, it becames "appropriate" to call him by his last name, although it is not common. In fact, we call most of our male politicians by their surnames. For example, Michel Temer and Jair Bolsonaro are always called Temer and Bolsonaro, not Michel and Jair. Although there are some exceptions, such as Ciro Gomes, which is more known as Ciro rather than Gomes.

January 10, 2019
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