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https://www.duolingo.com/S-KittenLuver10

German and Swedish?

Hey guys... I created my account to learn Swedish and i feel like a have a pretty good grasp on it so far. However, I want to start learning German, but I'm afraid I'll get German and Swedish words confused. Any tips/ advice? Thanks.

1 year ago

9 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/WildSage
WildSage
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Don't stress it. If you start confusing the words at first just relax and go slow on one of them.

Make a physical or mental note of words that are the same and words that are false friends.

Don't order öl in a German bar.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/gibbon_
gibbon_
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I would also recommend to get more familiar with one language first. Since you started Swedish already continue to do so. If you feel at ease with most if the words, grammar and constructions try to dip your nose into German.

As a German (I already explained in another answer why) I am struggling with Swedish a lot since it seems to be quite similar to German and English (each in different extents and aspects) and it gets confusing. I reckon that it will be quite similar for someone coming from English to Swedish and German.

I don't think that either Swedish or German is a language particularly easy to learn and understand. I would not want to have to learn German as a second language I have to admit. I hope you have fun with both some day.

If you need help with the German some day, feel free to contact me. :)

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/IsakNygren1
IsakNygren1
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German and Swedish are not so very similar. Only a few words are the same. The grammar is completely different. Swedish have their grammar closer to English than to German.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Mr_Eyl
Mr_Eyl
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There are actually quite a few false friends between the two, and an absolute ton of cognates. When I first started learning Swedish, the great majority of my vocabulary flashcards were Swedish / German, simply because the corresponding German word was closer than the English.

There are dozens of cognates in the first few parts of the Duo Swedish Memrise course, and the first 'verbs' lesson has more German cognates than English.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/gibbon_
gibbon_
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Being a native German speaker myself learning Swedish right now I have to agree to both. The grammar and many words are close to English - but also many words are close to German. Since I am quite fluent in English I am having a go on the Duolingo Swedish course in English (since I paid for Babble for a year which did not work out so well).

My biggest problem is the "translate into Swedish" exercises: I have to know to which language I have to build a bridge. "Socker" and "Zucker" for example (the latter being German" are merely differently pronounced. "Skärp" which is introduced as "belt" in English is very similar to "Schärpe" (which pronounced has a an extra E at the end but is the nearly the same word. It means "wide belt-like thing covering the lower body" but is easy to remember. "Tallrik" is "Teller" in German... "Tidning" is "Zeitung" which even seems to be constructed in a similar way ("Tid" == "Zeit", "ning" - "ung" - an ending to nominalize stuff?), I could go on.

Knowing only a very tiny part of the language though that might only be by accident and the lessons are just constructed that way. I think though that in their origins, the Swedish and German language have crossed many times and exchanged words - which - as with Dutch - makes it a challenge for German people to properly learn it.

When I first was in Sweden though as a young kid many years ago, I hardly knew any English (I was in 7th grade and all my English came from reading computer manuals and stuff) I found Swedish nearly as easy to read and understand as English. At least I could figure out - in conjunction with some pictures - what a newspaper headline would approximately mean.

The worst trap for German people however (and I really appreciate it being mentioned on Duolingo) is probably the definite singular thing in Swedish. The "en" ending in German usually means "dative plural" where it usually means "definite singular" in Swedish. That is something to wrap my head around but it is starting to get natural at least for the regular words. The irregular (barn? what the hell?) give me shivers.

Nonetheless I am happy to have the opportunity to learn this language and be in Exchange with you people about how everything works. This really seems like a friendly place to exchange experiences. Thank you :)

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/meg666
meg666
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Swedish has historically a ton of loanwords from lågtyska, there are also some similarities in the grammar. The smart thing to do is to use this to our advantage when learning these languages :)

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/slogger
sloggerPlus
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DogePamyuPamu is right. Stick with Swedish until you've learned a lot more of it--all the way through the Duo tree, if Swedish is your first foreign language. Get so you're comfortable with it and you feel confident. After that German or any other new language will be much easier.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Wolfrum154826

Many words in Swedish may sound and look very similar to German words, however you will notice certain trends that help you differentiate. For example, Willkommen in German is spelled with a "v" in Swedish ( Välkommen ).

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Ryan273513
Ryan273513
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I'm currently studying both languages. I began studying Swedish very casually 5 or so years ago, and about 6 months ago I took German 1 at college. Current I'd say I'm lower intermediate in both. And yes, I do confuse the languages quite often unless I'm 'warmed up'.

What I do to help with the confusion however is study Swedish in the morning and German at night, never one right after the other. I always make sure there is a gap between studying Swedish and German so, as someone else mentioned in this thread, I don't make the mistake of ordering 'öl' (oil-German) when I want öl '(beer-Swedish)

Anyways, good luck in your studies!

1 year ago