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  5. "O relógio é preciso."

"O relógio é preciso."

Translation:The clock is accurate.

February 18, 2013

18 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MRMsys

An interesting note: "preciso" translates as BOTH accuracy AND precision, which are COMPLETELY different concepts in English.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Danmoller

In technical schools, we learn the difference between "precisão" (precision) and "exatidão" (accuracy), but in common life they are not very well distinguished.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PaCa826187

To be fair, many English speakers (some more than others, cough-cough) have this problem, too.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Todd_Williams

I'd like to see "precise" as a viable translation


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/malejandro84

doesnt preciso used for need or want?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/djeidot

It has both meanings (accurate/precise, and necessary/needed), both work in this context.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Danmoller

Although true, it's very unlikely to see such a sentence without complements meaning "necessary".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/UserBob

Eu preciso de um relógio preciso. I need a watch precise.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Hoprint

Why not 'The clock is correct'?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/djeidot

Because

1 - "preciso" means accurate;
2 - accurate is not the same as correct.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/alkajugl

When I said the clock is "correct" I was told the correct answer was "the clock is right." But "right" has the same meaning as "correct" in this context. If they accept "the clock is right" then shouldn't they also accept "correct"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/delvi

I used watch and it was accepted, but necessary was not, even though it is one of the translations....


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/djeidot

You can report that too. "Necessary" or "needed" is another meaning of the word "preciso" and it makes sense in this context.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Grokford

Doesn't preciso also mean necessary? Like Paula Fernandes' Não Precisa?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Paulenrique

Yes. Precisar is also a verb: to need.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Raymond704692

If the meaning of the sentence is "the clock is accurate" then commonly accepted ways of saying this in English would include the clock is right or correct. If the clock is precise then this suggests the ability to distinguish between small fractions of a second. Perhaps an atomic clock or similar. The suggestion that the clock could be "sharp" would mean that the edges could cut your fingers but in parts of England might give the idea that the clock was running fast.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/LambKen

why not 'the clock is exact'?

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