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"Nothing is absolutely perfect."

Translation:Nenio estas absolute perfekta.

1 year ago

6 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/DavidStyIes
DavidStyIesPlus
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Heh. Without thinking, I wrote "Nenio perfektas" and am advised I missed a word (tute).

Of course, it is in the nature of perfection already to be an absolute value (there are not degrees of perfection; a thing is either perfect or it isn't), making the addition of "tute" a redundant tautology repeated more than once unnecessarily, one time after the other.

But in common usage, on the other hand, naturally it'll crop up plentifully.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/salivanto
salivanto
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Very unique.

Another alternative.

BTW, probably best not to change "estas -a" into "-as" without thinking. A lot of times it leads to mistakes.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/mizinamo
mizinamo
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"another alternative" sounds OK to me - there can be multiple alternatives of one choice and so one could try first one alternative and then another alternative.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/salivanto
salivanto
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It sounds OK to a lot of people - but "alternative" comes from the Latin word for "other" -- which will be familiar from "alter ego" - another me.

"My other alter ego is..."

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/mizinamo
mizinamo
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Ah, argument from etymology?

I presume that "I have three meetings next week and I have drawn up one agenda but the other two agendas aren't finalised yet" is similarly objectionable?

I don't think the Latin etymology is relevant to the modern-day English meaning of the word -- objections to things such as "very unique" or "most perfect" can be based on the English meaning not on anything in Latin.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/salivanto
salivanto
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I would say that arguments about "very unique" are arguments from etymology -- just that less time has passed. If a person says "very unique", it's clear that to that person, and to the people he learned English from, "unique" does not mean one-of-a-kind, but rather "possessing special and rare qualities."

Regardless of the validity of my argument, it sounds redundant to my ears.

I don't even see what your point is about agenda enough to have an opinion on it -- unless you're asking about the plural, in which case, I have no objection.

To say that island cultures tend to be insular just sounds silly to my ears. So does painting a mural on the floor or ceiling.

1 year ago