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"Estoy en contra de él."

Translation:I am against him.

5 years ago

43 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/Kenoryn

So in English we would probably say "I am opposed to him"?

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Armadulus

Correct! Or, a more common translation: I'm against him

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jbtaylor

That's exactly what I entered, and Duo said I was wrong. I submitted a report.

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Tim_Supermonkey

I wrote "I'm against him." and Duolingo marked it as right.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/LandonThom
LandonThom
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Thank you. I thought " I am against him" meant "I am versing him". They should make this distinction more clear.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/mendota

can anyone expand on the phrase "estar en contra"? is it supposed to be a phrase about interpersonal conflict? physical arrangement like leaning a post against a wall?

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/rspreng

"en contra de" = in opposition to "apoyar" = to lean, to rest "I was leaning against the desk" = "estaba apoyado en el escritorio," so says one of my books.

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/alejandrocarmo

In Spanish, "estar en contra de", it is "disagree with"; "be against" or "resist". You can be against--- "estar en contra de"----- a project... a plan.... a person....an idea...an ideology....

here, él = him.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Duomail
Duomail
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physical arrangement may be just "contra"" as well.

Estaba apoyado contra el escritorio, without "en" nor "de".

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Chynkia97

Why is there the word "en" in the sentence? Doesn't "en" mean in/at

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/rspreng

"en contra de" is an expression that means "in opposition to" = against

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Ghostshadow

Thank you for your translation. I don't understand Spanish. Perhaps DuoLingo should have a phrase section, many times I am wrong because of this.

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/brian1939

This clears it up perfectly

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/benmorleybrown

But I thought from earlier lessons that "contra" on its own means "against". So why is the "en" and "de" necessary here? What does "contra" mean on its own?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JessPkt

i would gets "contra" is just " contrary" on its own. In spanish you often have extra words when applying phrases to a person or thing.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ph516503
ph516503
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can anyone explain why estoy is used here, rather than "soy"? I thought "i am" translated as "yo soy". This is the first time I've encountered estoy.

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/animeyugi

"Soy" is used for permanent things, such as "soy canadiense", whereas "estoy" is for things that can change, such as your health, your location, etc.

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ph516503
ph516503
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thanks for the explanation animeyugi

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ivogeorg

So what does this sentence actually mean: (1) I disagree with him; (2) I am against him (as project leader); (3) We run against each other (in a competition); or (4) Whatever he does, I do the opposite?

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/miKel14

The sentence means (2). It doesn't matter what he does, is , says, etc, "I am against him."

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ivogeorg

Okay, thanks. I guess is a matter of developing an "ear for the language".

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Roger_Burke

I think the closer you are to the shared root meaning (Spanish and English) the more likely you are to have your answer accepted. As you stray further from that shared root, the number of possible translations grows. As we know context allows you to shade your meaning with other related words. So, I would suggest accepting the DL translation and as your confidence and vocabulary grows feel free to venture off with alternate translations.

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/fatbactory

Couldn't it also mean "I am against IT"? Duolingo says that's wrong

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Armadulus

It can't be because it uses él (pronoun for him). If it was against it, it would be 'Estoy en contra de ello' (ello being a rarely used pronoun for it). Hope I helped!

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JMBarnes
JMBarnes
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I’m not convinced this is all there is to it. From what I’ve read, él can be used to mean “it” when it is the object of a preposition. So given appropriate context, couldn’t this sentence indeed mean “I am against it”? For example, wouldn’t the following be correct?

Mi hermana tiene un plan. Estoy en contra de él.
My sister has a plan. I am against it.

(Here él refers to plan, which is masculine.)

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Celesar

Estoy en Ctrl Del

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/bexbat
bexbat
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Why wouldn't it just be "Estoy contra el"? Other examples included just contra like "pato contra tortuga".

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/rmcgwn

Not knowing the idiom I guessed "I am not in favor of him" Wrong!

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/skiallday

"I am opposed to him" would also be correct. NO?

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/rmcgwn

I checked this out and while I did find a couple instances as you suggested it was overwhelming 'against him' that was common use.

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/schlenkerm

Why is "en" a part of it? Is "Estoy contra de el" the same thing?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Roger_Burke

I think I would translate the phrase as "I am in opposition to him" with the "en" meaning "in."

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/RockinAbs

Why use "en" and "de" here? Why aren't de and el combined into "del"?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jbtaylor

From what I understand, the "en" and "de" aren't necessarily required, but it's a common expression, especially when giving emotional emphasis. Just one of those things to learn. (More about "contra": http://spanish.about.com/od/prepositions/qt/Contra.htm)

The reason the words aren't combined is that it's not "el" (no accent: the), it's "él" (with an accent: he)—two different words. "De" and "el" (no accent) combine to mean "of the". "De" and "él" (accent) do not combine.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/RockinAbs

Thank you! So 'Estoy contra el' would also be correct?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/LiiziiKaathe

SOY LA QUE MAS ESPAÑOL SE... OK NO SOY DE COLOMBIA Y KIERO GANAR PUNTOS xDDD lol

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/gal111

What is the diffrence between "soy" and "estoy"?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JoelFeodiy

I saw the tip here that estoy is for a more temporary condition and soy is more a permanent condition. Could we say "soy en contra de él" meaning something like "I am against him [and always have been and always will be] " - a more extreme disposition. Does Spanish allow you to be creative like that?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/agrandvoyage

I wrote "I disagree with him" because "I'm against him" is kind of a rough/literal translation, but they marked it wrong :/

4 years ago