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"The tobacco shop is open, do you come in?"

Translation:A trafik nyitva van, bejöttök?

1 year ago

17 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/Dorka85100

I am Hungarian and I wrote this sentence: A dohánybolt nyitva van, nem jössz be? That I think correct as well. There are more solutions as so often in this language

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/BetsyLowe
BetsyLowePlus
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Why is "van" necessary in this case?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Shamarth
Shamarth
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Because nyitva isn't an adjective but an adverb. (But in colloquial language van is often left out anyway.)

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/bolcshulye2

I would have thought (from a UK perspective) that "tobacconist" is probably the best translation for "trafik" - although the word is now a bit dated in the UK.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/DavidCarver
DavidCarver
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"Do you come in" is presumably DUO dialect for the standard "are you coming in"?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Joeintheory

are you coming in? is probably more frequent, but there's nothing wrong with do you come in?. The simple present tense is used in a lot of different ways in English, not only for habitual actions. This sentence wouldn't sound weird in the right context.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/DagmarHoratio
DagmarHoratio
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Can I get a clarification on what "trafik" indicates in the wild? "Tobacco shop" isn't really a term that gets used in the US, and usually I'd either imagine a place that specializes in cigars and pipe tobacco or a head shop.* My Hungarian friend interprets this more as a bodega/mini-mart/convenience store, but is there some more precise distinction, or a different word you'd use for a bodega?

*"Head shop" refers to a shop that sells tobacco and other legal or quasi-legal drugs, along with drug paraphernalia....and now that I think about it I suppose that's a plausible meaning given we've been talking about criminals and prison.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Shamarth
Shamarth
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AFAIK a trafik mainly sells cigarettes along with some other miscellaneous things (beverages, maybe newspapers too (?) ). But it seems to me that this word is not that widespread anymore. Just like Dorka, I would also use dohánybolt instead. (But then again, I don't smoke so I might not be the most authentic source.)

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/DagmarHoratio
DagmarHoratio
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Thanks. So you'd use "dohánybolt" for a convenience store? (Hehe, I seem to recall "dohány" means tobacco, making "tobacco shop" an even more literal translation.)

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Shamarth
Shamarth
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Well actually for a couple of years now only "national tobacco shops" (nemzeti dohánybolt) have been allowed to sell tobacco products in Hungary, so dohánybolt isn't really a fitting name for simple convenience stores anymore. You can use trafik for them (okay I just contradicted my previous comment... sorry for that). But I suppose many people call tobacco shops trafik too, because, well, it's shorter.

Okay, let's clear it up:

  • convenience store (no tobacco products) = trafik
  • tobacco shop (they also sell alcohol, magazines, chewing gum etc.) = (nemzeti) dohánybolt / trafik

So that's how it is.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/vvsey
vvsey
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In "old times", trafik used to be "the" convenience store. But do not think "seven eleven" (US) or anything fancy like that. No actual food or drinks were sold there. There was no such thing as bottled water (total craziness, you could simply drink tap water). You could buy cigarettes, maybe newspapers, bus tickets, chewing gum, small toys maybe, stickers, candy, refills for your gas stove lighter (yes!), stuff like that. Many times, the "trafik" would be a small "booth", an enclosed little structure with windows to display all the products, with a little window opening to make a transaction with the vendor. Imagine a permanent street vendor on major street corners, or very little closed spaces, where you would not enter but rather talk to the vendor through the little window. A "box office" for the street. A synonym of "trafik", or the official name of it, was "dohánybolt". There was a joke that "trafik" is a verb: "én trafok, te trafsz, ő trafik", and the past tense of "trafik" is "dohánybolt". Again, this is just a joke, but it shows that the two mostly meant the same thing.
Now, with "nemzeti dohánybolt", it is even more convenient to refer to that thing as just "trafik".

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Judit294350

Except these are R18 "convenience stores" (we had this in NZ when for a few years you could buy synthetic drugs - until they realized they were worse than the ones you weren't allowed to buy!)

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/DavidCarver
DavidCarver
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anyone know the etymology of :trafik" - could it possibly be related to the idea of trafficing in dangerous drugs?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Joeintheory

It's maybe a good mnemonic, but in my experience so far, these sorts of things are far more likely to be coincidence than anything else.

If you're looking for loanwords in Hungarian, it seems that knowing Slavic languages helps some, and secondly Turkish, but mostly the only ones an English speaker would recognize are very modern ones.

Also I believe a trafik is more generally a newsstand besides just being a tobacco shop.

EDIT: I was informed that 1. Trafik is used in German (at least, Austrian German) and 2. to traffic in English came from only meaning to trade (no sinister meaning) so actually maybe there is an etymological connection

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/RyagonIV
RyagonIV
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You got it pretty much already. :)

Trafik comes from the Austro-German "Tabaktrafik" (tobacco shop), which has its origin in the Italian "traffico", simply meaning "trade". So the Austrians took the "shop" part of the "trade" meaning, while the English got the "transport" part (via Middle French).

6 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Elloughton

This sentence is weird in English: who is speaking? It doesn't make sense.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Judit294350

I think we'd say "are you coming in?"

1 year ago