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https://www.duolingo.com/adahad26

What are the uses of se in spanish?

I've gotten a lot further than object pronouns in the tree but se just keeps coming back to haunt me. What are the uses of se? Also, one DL sentence was a lot of trouble for me. The sentence is "Se va al mar" and was translated as "She goes to the sea". Why is se needed here? (I've been using va without se and i think i may be in a lot of trouble)

4 years ago

17 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/OldSpiceGuy
OldSpiceGuy
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Se is used reflexively, like the English word "myself". There are some usages of verbs where it's required by the language. Generally, we treat these as new verbs, as the meaning is sometimes different. In this case, you have the verb irse, meaning to leave/go/take onesself, which has a slightly different meaning than the regular ir. Another example would be poner (to put) vs ponerse (to put on, i.e. to dress oneself). http://en.wikibooks.org/wiki/Spanish/Reflexive_Verbs

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/wynrich
wynrichPlus
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"Se va" can be used idiomatically to mean "he/she/it leaves". Per http://www.spanishdict.com/topics/show/108, "irse" often means "to leave". So, "me voy" can be translated "I leave" and "te vas" as "you leave", etc. Per spanishdict, "irse" is idiomatic (i.e., doesn't make a lot of logical sense). :)

In Duolingo, when I came across "se va al mar" translated as "she goes to the sea", I checked the discussion and some people did think "leave" should be accepted there.

Sometimes, too, "se" creates a passive or impersonal verb. For example "Se habla español aquí" would mean "Spanish is spoken here". Or "se venden ropa" means "Clothing is sold". http://www.spanishdict.com/topics/show/87

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/mrben83
mrben83
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For the impersonal I tend to think as Se meaning "one" as in "one can speak spanish here". Se va I always think of as meaning to take oneself. makes it easier to remember I think. :o

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/tkardel
tkardel
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While not meaning to discourage you, there was an entire semester long course just on the uses of 'se' in graduate school. :( It's a complex subject with some main ideas, which are noted already, and many arcane little corners that can be hard to grasp. The 'se' is usually an element that adds something to or changes the original meaning of the verb. One thing to keep in mind: there are a small handful of verbs that only exist in the reflexive with 'se', while most verbs can be used with or without it (with a slight change in meaning e.g. 'ir' = to go and 'irse' = to leave) For instance, to my knowledge the verb 'jactarse' (to boast) only occurs with the reflexive pronoun and never without it. Why? I cannot tell you.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/subetealanutria
subetealanutria
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A lot of good information has already been posted, so I will jsut say this: For native speakers can also be tricky. They know how to use it intuitively, but most of them will fail spectacularly at listing its uses. : D

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/arismartin

If you say, "va al mar" it can be anything... Water of a river... but in this case, se, replace one person... He or she... That is... She goes to the sea (ella va al mar). You can replace she by the pronoun "se" that refer herself (reflexive). You would have written "él se va al mar" duolingo would also accept it.

Sometimes it's possible to see written "ella se va al mar"... She, herself, goes to the sea

It can also be an indirect object ... "Se lo dije" ... I told her... I told him

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Samsta
Samsta
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The reason for it being "Se lo dije" not "Le lo dije" or "Les lo dije" is simply because of the repeated "l" sound, which does not sound very good. Just remember that "le lo / lelo" and "les lo / leslo" always become "se lo". "Dáselo" = "Give it to him/her/them", "Dáselos" = "Give them to him/her/them"

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/mercutio

object pronouns to me was TOTALLY confusing....still its my hardest section of the spanish tree, and i still mostly just guess my answers, I really would like duo lingo to put some work into teaching that skill in a better more clear way somehow, it makes no sense to me still so i do understand your frustration

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Lrtward
Lrtward
Mod
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http://www.spanishdict.com/grammar

Scroll down to the "Pronouns" section.

Study the sub-sections. Repeat. Profit!

Oh, I just noticed the reflexive "se" is under verbs. Here's a direct link to information about reflexive verb pronouns: http://www.spanishdict.com/topics/show/85

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jackiestilgoe

Me too. I've had to research elsewhere to understand. I think I have it but the next day it's gone. Arr

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jorma1998b

Se is a reflexive pronoun. Is stuff you do to yourself. Some verbs are reflexive, like peinarse, dormirse, acostarse, despertarse, banarse, arreglarse, morirse, casarse, etc. You use reflexive pronouns me te se nos os se; me duermo, te duermes, etc. ir can be reflexive sometimes, so it's difficult to know. I can say: voy a la tienda, tu vas al mercado, vamos de compras, etc. But, as other indicated, me voy, or nos vamos, indicate I am or we are leaving. Notice that se doesn't replace the noun; i can say: yo me voy, tu te vas. Also, she goes to the sea, or he goes to the sea, and even "you go to the sea" would be acceptable.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/BurritoBowl25

Whats the difference between "me voy" and just "voy"?

3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/arismartin

Hi, Well, there is an important difference. The expression ‘me voy’ expresses a decision you made. You are telling people you decided to leave.

On the other hand ‘voy’, this way, alone, is more an answer to someone who is reclaiming your presence. For example:

‘Este sitio es aburrido, me voy’ (this place is boring, I leave)

‘Oye. ¿Puedes ayudarme?´ ... ´¡Voy! (Listen, can you help me? ... ‘Coming!’

In some contexts you can use both of them meaning the same...

‘Voy a casa’ ‘Me voy a casa’

However, the ‘me’ always indicates that you made a personal decision and many times it indicates some kind of determination, this ‘me’ kind of intensify your decision. You made a decision. If you don’t use the ‘me’ it sounds more as an intention.

I hope you understand these sutil differences, lol.

3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Aliciaftw

Here's a video by my professor about the many uses of se: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-BKpNVyERHs

I hope this helps. :)

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/wynrich
wynrichPlus
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That was great. I look forward to seeing many of his other presentations. Thank you.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/anomalousjack

one of the best things I have read on the subject

4 Ways to Use “Se” to Express Yourself More Broadly

http://www.realfastspanish.com/vocabulary/spanish-pronoun-se

1 year ago