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"Él no es necesariamente un viejo."

Translation:He is not necessarily an old person.

February 19, 2013

34 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Hagson

"an elder" should allowed


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/rspreng

I think that "elder" as a noun carries implications of wisdom or authority that "old person" does not.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/percyflage

For sure "elder" is widely used like that in Canada for an older person, particularly in the Aboriginal communities.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Iago

The Aboriginal Communities (i.e. the reserves, not native neighborhoods in Canadian cities) hardly count as widespread use. Besides, in the reserves, "elder" is used to refer to the local leaders, those who work closely with the chief, even if they are not necessarily ancient.

An Elder is a relative term. It means that one is older than some other standard. For example, I am an elder, at least to many people, because there are many who are younger than me.

But I'm not an old person (un viejo) because I'm only 22 years old.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/percyflage

Thank you. I DO hear it used sometimes often see it written in news stories. I always think that "elder" connotes wisdom as well as seniority. I think it was used similarly in 18-19th Century Britain, from my reading of older literature. You clarify our local useage of a word that I enjoy very well. Now I shall use it more!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/percyflage

Headline Sun News Canada "Manitoba aboriginal elder ends hunger strike" April 2013 Elder is a priesthood office in the Mormon Church Elders of Zion - Scary! etc.

I have been honoured as an elder by an first nations community :) OK?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SwedishHunk

There's a big difference between an elder and an elderly.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/megustamivida

I'd like to get some clarification on this from a native speaker. "Old man" is not particularly respectful in English. I would say it only to someone in a teasing way. If I were talking to an actual elderly person, I would say "elderly man" or senior citizen.

I want to know what the politeness level of this phrase is in Spanish before I start flinging it around. Although I am quite happy to describe myself as una vieja, regardless.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/red_ant_628

Relating to the previous comment, does anyone know if "viejo" as a noun is considered at all disrespectful?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Iago

Elder is different than old person. One must have another point of reference. An elder is someone who is older than whichever other person. For example, a 12-year old is an elder to an 8-year old but is not an old person. I think the noun for "elder" would be "mayor" (which is the -adjective- for elder, so I assume it's the noun too)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/megustamivida

There's Elder, the noun, which may or may not be related to age. It is more of a rank. Elder the adjective is used when comparing two people. I would not refer to a 12-year-old as "an elder" but I would use it as a descriptor, "the elder sibling," or "the eldest" if there were more than two.

As far as I know, there is no equivalent word in Spanish? It seems we compare more by degrees, e.g., "mas joven que..." I wish I knew for certain!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/meghanworrell

I think you are confusing elder with older. Elder is a noun used to describe a person of old age. However, I have never believed it to indicate wisdom..


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/oedipusface

NOPE, the use of elder as an adjective is correct, and it is also used to indicate a person of knowledge, as described by @megustamivida. http://www.dictionary.com/browse/elder?s=t Please notice how at the end of this definition it specifies that "elder" and "older" are confused with one another.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/edo9k

It should be allowed.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/darrylogan

what about 'senior'? That seems to be the most common and inoffensive term for old stiffs these days.


[deactivated user]

    sounds good to me


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/gr8rubs

    I'm with you. The term for "old wives tale" in Spanish is "cuenta de viejas".


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/dkat
    • 194

    I would translate this as he is not necessarily old - is that wrong?


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/willbyzx

    I wrote that down, and it was correct.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Kriognosz

    I called him an Old One...


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Iago

    That sounds like something out of Lovecraft...


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Roman538532

    I put "he is not a necessary person" why?!?!


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/iCRICKET

    "He is necessarily not an old man." Doesn't work?


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/fairtrade

    "necessarily not" would mean he is definitely not old and that is necessarily true. "not necessarily" means that he may not be old.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Si_Robertson

    viejo = old man ?? vieja = old woman ???


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/amble2lingo

    Yes, CARTMAAABRAH, "viejo/a" can be used as a noun or an adjective (el viejo/la vieja; el coche viejo/la silla vieja). Spanishdict.com has a few other interesting translations: http://www.spanishdict.com/translate/viejo. Just make sure you don't call your best, oldest friend "mi amigo viejo" (my friend who is old) instead of "mi viejo amigo" (my long-time friend) or the friendship might not get any older!

    In a story we were translating in a Spanish class a while ago, the term "un hombre mayor" came up. This can mean either "an older man" or "an elderly man." The teacher said it was better/nicer to say "un hombre de edad," (literally, a man of age) which she translated to mean a senior citizen. A retiree or pensioner is called: el/la jubilado/a.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/porkrind94

    Elder in use has two meanings; it is the name of a position of status and also a comparison of age. Both are viable and regularly used in English. Most foreigner's feel it has one meaning because it is most regularly used in movies as the position or status. While in everyday life it is used mostly as the comparison of age meaning having lived many years or more years than many people.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/EugeneTiffany

    Yes but what about what the Spanish word "viejo" means to a Spanish speaking person?


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/thediamondsmile

    whats wrong with that sentence


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/annabellen999736

    I'd like to get some clarification on this from a native speaker. "Old man" is not particularly respectful in English. I would say it only to someone in a teasing way. If I were talking to an actual elderly person, I would say "elderly man" or senior citizen.

    I want to know what the politeness level of this phrase is in Spanish before I start flinging it around. Although I am quite happy to describe myself as una vieja, regardless


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PegWhitman

    I said he is not necessarily old..then noticed the un before viejo. Is that the indicator that person should be used???


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/gr8rubs

    Sí. The word "un" indicates that they are using the word as a noun and not an adjective.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Addscottholl

    If you start the sentence with he then surely it would mean he is not necessarily an old man ..


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RyxDash

    He is not necessarily old. Was accepted

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