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"She only eats meat."

Translation:Ella únicamente come carne.

0
5 years ago

89 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/Tony111ster

What is the difference between "solamente" and "únicamente"?

85
Reply23 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Hlok
Hlok
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In this context they are interchangeable. If one was chosen over the other in context únicamente would usually refer to only one of something such as "I only have one cat" - "Unicamente tengo un gato" while solamente would be used when more items are involved "There are only three children" - "Solamente hay tres ninos"

26
Reply1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Wesley103092

Awesome explanation!

0
Reply8 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/nWnlJ

i had thought it is equivalent to the english solely vs uniquely, but that is inconsistent with how Duo uses them. i would also like to know. for example, here, i think unicamente would mean "she uniquely eats meat" meaning she eats it in a unique way, vs "she solely eats meat" meaning meat is the only thing she eats. i would love for someone more knowledgeable to weigh in.

4
Reply2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/dave-0

That doesn't seem healthy.

60
Reply4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/44popcorn44

Its not lol

0
Reply4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/encody

First she's only eating fruit, then she's only eating meat. She should make up her mind...

55
Reply4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SqueezeboxSarah

Then she was only eating sugar. She sounds like one of those fad diet followers.

56
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/marvincorea
marvincorea
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Going paleo...

24
Reply4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/writeli

Technically some of the English translations listed are incorrect. To say she eats only meat and she only eats meat are two different things. The first means she eats nothing but meat. The second means she does nothing else but eat meat. The location of only matters in English too.

Of course that's being very formal but it seems to work that way with sólo (or am I misunderstanding it?)

22
Reply14 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/gabasco
gabasco
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The position of adverbs in English and Spanish matters!

Only she eats meat.
(No one else eats meat)

She only eats meat.
(She doesn't do anything else)

She eats only meat.
(She doesn't eat anything different than meat)

She eats meat only.
(She doesn't eat anything different than meat)

The meaning of the sentence changes considerably with the change in the position of the adverb only.

92
Reply83 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Alex.Essilfie
Alex.Essilfie
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That's a great explanation of what the sentence means based on the position of the adverb only. Could you possibly give the Spanish equivalents as well?

15
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/KirtashFowl
KirtashFowl
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Sólo ella come carne (No one else eats meat)

Ella sólo come carne (She doesn't do anything else or she doesn't eat anything different than meat)

Ella come sólo carne (She doesn't eat anything different than meat) Usually, it would be said "ella sólo come carne"

Ella come carne sólo (Same as "ella sólo come carne") Sounds weird, better if you use it before the verb

Sólo = solo = solamente = únicamente

Some years ago, "sólo" was the short way to say "solamente" (that means the same as "únicamente") while "solo" (without "tilde") was incorrect. Now the RAE (Spanish dictionary) accepts and recommends the word "solo". Personally I prefer "sólo" because this was a "tilde diacrítica", which means that this "tilde" exists only to differentiate the words: - "Sólo" (="solo"): adverb that means only - "Solo (/sola/solos/solas)": adjective or sustantive that means just or alone Example: "Jorge fue al cine solo" can be: -Jorge went to the movies alone -Jorge went to the movies only (solo = sólo) With the example "ella come carne sólo" there is no doubt, because carne and ella are "female words", so, with the adjective, it would be "ella come carne sola" (she eats meat without sauce, chips, whatever or she, being alone, eats meat)

24
Reply22 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Jess371314

well, "ella come carne solo" is incorrect but a native speaker can understand that you try to say "ella come carne sola = She eats meats alone" and the "tilde" is not very important if you write something informal and duolingo has so many at this and it is because the RAE constantly changes the rules of the spanish xD Example: "esta" and "está", this 2 words means different things, the first is like a pronoun and the second means the words " Am, are and is", but now "está" doesn't exist and "esta" is the same as "está".

It is your decision if you want to accept all the changes in spanish, for example, I do not like the change for "esta" and "está" because for me in a formal writing it is important so I write "está" but according to the RAE it is incorrect

Source: I'm native spanish speaker :)

1
Reply2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/KirtashFowl
KirtashFowl
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I disagree, I think "tildes" are always important, even when it's informal. RAE never says that "está" (the verb) has to be without the "tilde", they said that "ésta" (the pronoun) is without it, so now "esta" can be also the determinant and the pronoun

1
2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Peabianjay

Since you're a native speaker, perhaps you could provide some examples of similar sentences with significantly different meanings:

She eats meat alone. (She is alone, eating meat.)

She eats meat alone. (She eats meat but not with other stuff.)

She alone eats meat. (She is the only person that eats meat.)

Only she eats meat. (Nobody else does.)

She eats only meat. (Never vegetables.)

She is only eating meat. (right now, anyway).

(Note, the first English sentence can be interpreted different ways. No doubt, this happens in Spanish, too.)

In retrospect....I should've used "He eats cheese", so everything would be male. Oh well.

0
2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Peabianjay

Since the accent changes it from adjective to adverb....wouldn't "come carne solo" actually mean "the meat is by itself", rather than "the eating".

Some people like quiche, but I prefer to eat my eggs by themselves.

Prefiero comer huevos solo. (I might be having bacon and eggs...but I don't mix them, or put anything on them.) Prefiero comer sólo huevos. (I prefer eggs, and nothing else.)

Not that I'm sure....just speculating.

0
Reply2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/KirtashFowl
KirtashFowl
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If you say "como el huevo solo" then it can be what you say, but "carne" is femenine and "huevos" is plural and the adjective change, so it would be "come carne sola" and "prefiero comer huevos solos".

0
2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/LawrenceHa12

You guys are so smart. I hope this old gringo can catch up. Seriously I really enjoy your comments

4
Reply2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/semitones

"She only eats meat" might have meant "she does nothing but eat meat" a long time ago, but English is not that strict anymore, and any English speaker would understand "She only eats meat" as meaning Meat is all she eats.

12
Reply13 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/The.Other.Caleb

But the old meaning is funnier..... :(

0
Reply1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/woodjorge

Why solo and not sola?

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Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/mitaine56

woodjorge- because it's an adverb, it doesn't take the gender

8
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/mariah.per

Would "Ella sólo come carne." Work?

3
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/randumari

I tried that and it said the accent over sólo was wrong.

1
Reply2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/KirtashFowl
KirtashFowl
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It would work because it is correct

0
Reply2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Jeffrey855877
Jeffrey855877
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It was accepted by Duo 2 Aug 2017

However, Duo said that the accent over the o in sólo should not be there. Initially, I thought that was wrong, because I thought that, without the accent, the sentence is ambiguous.

My reasoning was that sólo functions ONLY as an adverb, while solo can be either adj. or adverb. However, since the subject is feminine, "she alone eats meat" [adjective form] would be ella sola come carne. It would not be ambiguous to say ella solo come carne to express "She only eats meat [and nothing else]" because solo cannot apply to ella, since it does not agree in gender.

If the sentence were "He only eats meat" you would have to use the accented o, because él solo come carne is ambiguous - it can mean either "He alone eats meant" or "He only eats meat". Él sólo come carne can only mean "He only eats meant". You'd probably have to say something something like Solo él come carne, if that's correct. I'm not sure about that last one.

0
Reply1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/thingngamchon

does 'solo' not mean alone? ie Él es 'solo' nuevamente

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Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/mitaine56

thing- I have reported it because sólo is an adverb not an adjective. I'm sure it needs the accent here.

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Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/KirtashFowl
KirtashFowl
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In fact, it doesn't, RAE recommends to write the adverb "sólo" without accent, but it's correct (and I still write it)

0
Reply2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/mitaine56

kirtash- I know know that you're right about the accent, but I'll continue to use it because I learned it this way. Also for new learners it's easier to see the difference with the accent.

0
Reply2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/KirtashFowl
KirtashFowl
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I use it too. But when I teach someone about that I tell them what's better according the rules, despite I also say that with the accent is easy to learn and there's no ambiguities as "Trabaja solo los jueves".

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Reply2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/mitaine56

kirtash- your exemple is very good, with or without accent, 2 different meanings.

0
2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/HarpoChico

She looks more like a werewolf every day!

2
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/howcheng
howcheng
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She also suffers from scurvy.

2
Reply1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/The.Other.Caleb

This comment is too good for me not to reply. Hilarious!

0
Reply1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Avery_Thaemert

First she will only eat fruit and now she will only eat meat... she should make up her mind.

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Reply1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/technoboi

I translated this as: Ella come carne únicamente

1
Reply5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Iago
Iago
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Did it mark you as wrong? If it did it may be because the adverb has to go next to the verb (i.e. "Ella come únicamente carne" would also have been correct)

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Reply5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SaulM

Yes, I'm fairly certain unlike English, in Spanish the adverb can't be strung along until the end of the sentence.

2
Reply5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/LazCon
LazCon
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Even in English, adverb position often matters, especially with the adverb "only". Watch the difference between quickly and only. We'll use the sentence "The girl threw the ball."

Quickly, she threw the ball. She quickly threw the ball. She threw the ball quickly. All three sentences use the adverb 'quickly' the describe how 'the girl threw the ball'. But, "only" is different. It can act as an adjective or adverb to modify nouns, verbs, and other adjectives, changing the implied meaning of a sentence.

Only the girl threw the blue ball -- (modifies 'the girl') Implies the boys did not throw it. Just the girl.

The only girl threw the blue ball -- (modifies 'girl') She was the sole female. The rest were boys.

The girl only threw the blue ball -- (modifies 'threw') She did not hit or kick it.

The girl threw only the blue ball -- (modifies 'the blue ball') She did not throw the yellow or red one.

The girl threw the only blue ball -- (modifies 'blue') There were many balls, but only one was blue.

The girl threw the blue ball only -- (modifies 'the blue ball') Again she did not throw red/yellow one

The girl threw only the ball -- (modifies 'ball') Implies she did not throw the bat or glove, just the ball.

Notice, in many instances 'just' could replace only without changing the meaning.

Just the girl threw... The girl just threw.... The girl threw just the ball.

Other times, it can't. Saying "The just girl threw..." uses 'just' to modify 'girl'. This means she is honest and fair. It does not mean the same as 'only'.

12
Reply73 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/technoboi

Yes it did mark me wrong but I suppose that it can't cover al eventualities. Thanks for your comment. :-)

1
Reply5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Ranchers1

What about "ella come sólo carne"

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Reply4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/mitaine56

ranchers- duo told me I was almost correct because I put an accent on solo. I don't understand thet the accent isn't correct here, because sólo is an adverb and solo means alone.

6
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/droma
droma
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that should work also.

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Reply4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/GeorgeT
GeorgeT
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No I think that means she eats meat alone, or by herself

1
Reply4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MissSpell
MissSpell
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GeorgeT you have that mixed up. Solo --without the accent-- means alone. (I remember this because the O is alone without his friend the accent mark)

https://spanish.yabla.com/lessons.php?lesson_id=90

Like Ranchers1 and others on this thread, I wrote, "ella sólo come carne," and even though it was accepted, it told me that sólo was a typo and should be solo. I'm not sure if this is an error on duo's part, or if there is some rule that i haven't heard yet. I know the accent is often dropped when context provides enough clarity to distinguish the meaning. However, i don't see why clarifying it's meaning would be wrong.

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Reply2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Talca
Talca
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Accepted: Ella solo come carne.

1
Reply4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JFascetti

What's the difference between única and únicamente?

1
Reply1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Peabianjay

Única is an adjective. Only Bob walked. (No one else.)

Únicamente is an adverb. Bob only walked. (He didn't run, or cycle.)

In English (as you can see) "only" works for both.

1
Reply1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/WyltonTheWhyte

She is a ......WEREWOLF!!!! run!

1
Reply1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/alexis585810

PETA must hate this person

1
Reply1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JoshuaManu7

Only should be "sola" because its refering to a female, why did I get this wrong?

1
Reply1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Peabianjay

This is a little confusing. "Solo" in this sentence is qualifying the verb "eating", NOT the girl.

It's not that she's by herself. (Ella está sola.)

Or that nobody else eats meat. (Sola ella come carne.)

Just like "Únicamente" or "solamente" which are adverbs, they don't do the male/female thing (since they modify the verb.)

"Sólo" is confusing because it's an adverb (as in this sentence) which is always "Sólo"....err....almost. The accent is optional.

"Solo/Sola" is an adjective (which takes the sex of the noun is modifying).

"Solo/Sola" is also a noun (which, again, is the sex of the thing it's representing.)

1
Reply1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/anisahr

I said: Ella solamente come el carne. Is solamente wrong in this context?

0
Reply5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Iago
Iago
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No, it's fine. What's wrong is "el carne."

In this case you don't need the article, and even if you did it'd be "la carne."

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Reply5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Herb13
Herb13
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Lago, why no "la" carne? Implied in the sentence?

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Reply4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/mitaine56

herb- she eats meat in general, no matter the type of meat

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Reply3 years ago