"The days of winter end early."

Translation:I giorni d'inverno finiscono presto.

6 years ago

19 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/lightgreen

Why not, "I giorni dell'inverno finiscono presto"?

6 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ericalridley
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They must have changed it because that's exactly what I put and I got it right.

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/HappyBeaver

Yes, now they do accept it. But I would really like to understand the difference between the two versions.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/mahankr
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It's just as tmac876 said. "Dell'inverno" is a contraction meaning "of the." This sentence is "The days of winter end early," not "The days of the winter end early, " which is not what they want and sounds unnatural. In general, if you want to say just "of," use di or d'. If you want to say of the, use dell' or one of its derivatives.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/tmac876

I was also wondering that...my conclusion is that dell'inverno means "of the winter" and duolingo is a bit fickle about specific translation.

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/brunobruck

Wonder that too...

6 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ivana-nana

By now, I think hints are sometimes purposely misleading.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/iced-latte

I feel "presto" means the winter days will end soon, whereas as early means that the sun goes down around six o'clock. What do you think? How could we translate to the latter meaning?

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Flysalot
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Good question. According to google translate "The winter days will end soon" translates as "i giorni dell'inverno finiranno presto" using the future tense. Now I know that Italians use the present tense instead of future more often than we do but substituting the present in reverse translation gave me: "i giorni dell'inverno finiscono presto" = "the winter days end early"

This is precisely the difference that I was told regarding future tense. Use the present for something that is happening today or this week but the future when you are starting to talk about next Christmas or in this case next spring.

9 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jennesy
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Why doesn't "termina" work here?

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Lynnich
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I put termina as well, and got it wrong (damn those hints!!) maybe it's wrong because the days are "they" and terminare (to end) should be terminano (is that even a word?) I should have put finiscono instead of trying to be different!

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/benczurp
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Can someone confirm whether it is indeed wrong, or just missing from the coded set of acceptable solutions?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/friswing
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Me too, I put 'terminano' (giorni = plural), it it not possible?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Samuel.martins
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Dovrei parlare finishono o finiskono?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Flysalot
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finiskono

you would need an i or e following the sc to make the sh sound. e.g. scienza, or sciopero

9 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MyrlynG

why doesn't "l'giorni" work for "the days"? Is it because giorni begins with a consonant?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Flysalot
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giorni is plural so you want i (masculine plural starting with a consonant). Apostrophes are only used for missing vowels like the d'inverno in this sentence: di inverno shortened to d'inverno.

9 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Flysalot
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Both d'inverno and dell'inverno give the same answer in google translate.

I would never use dello inverno. (Inverno is masc isn't it?)

But what is wrong with di inverno - surely this doesn't always have to be contracted?

9 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/mary973134

I guess it does.... di before vogals contracts; da doesn't.

5 months ago
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