https://www.duolingo.com/kdb119

Ble mae'r siop fara?

  • 1404

Would this not more usually be 'Where is the baker's shop?’ or 'Where is the baker's/bakery?' in English rather than ’Where is the bread shop'?

January 24, 2017

7 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/Adams861

I believe that in West Wales, a place where they sell bread and pastries is commonly referred to by locals as the bread shop - siop fara. I imagine that for the above sentence, Ble mae'r popty would be acceptable?

January 24, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/kdb119
  • 1404

Ah, so popty can mean bakery as well as oven. Makes sense.

January 24, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/ibisc

popty comes from the idea of the 'bakehouse' (pobi + tŷ). In many places the local baker would own and run the popty as part of their business. For major events such as Christmas, the village families would bring their large meat items such as goose, joints of meat or whatever to be baked in the popty together with everyone else's.

The father of one of our friends was a baker in west Wales, and she remembers the local families still bringing large items to be put in the popty for baking/roasting as late as the 1960s.

January 24, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/kdb119
  • 1404

Actually, it's a great shame that the practice died out; but then that was the time when almost every village or street corner in towns had their own bakery. If you think about it, it was quite environmentally friendly since, except for special occasions as you described, dishes such as pies or cuts of meat would be brought in when buying bread each morning and collected later in the late afternoon or early evening. The dishes would cook slowly in the residual heat as the oven cooled down from the overnight/early morning baking.

It also meant that the tougher and thus cheaper cuts of meat could be gently cooked producing tender and very tasty nutricious meals. Often the very cheapest cuts may even be given away free by the butchers, or for a very small charge.

Of course, almost all local bakers and bakers have long vanished. I'm very lucky in that, although the bakery disappeared long ago, the village where I live in the New Forest still has an excellent and thriving local butchers.

January 24, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/kdb119
  • 1404

Yes, indeed. Similar things occurred in England prior to people having their own ovens. Prior to that, most things were cooked on open fires, either in a pot or pan. At a guess, the practice possibly largely disappeared in England a bit earlier than more rural parts of Wales.

January 24, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/Adams861

I believe so but I could be mistaken? Of possible interest to you would be 'popty ping,' the word(s) for microwave, the alternative translation being microdon.

January 24, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/kdb119
  • 1404

Thanks. Yes, I was aware of 'popty ping', but until recently didn't realise 'popty' meant oven (amongst other things). :-)

January 24, 2017
Learn Welsh in just 5 minutes a day. For free.