"Why do you like to drink strong coffee?"

Translation:Warum trinken Sie gern starken Kaffee?

February 20, 2013

20 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/lindelenilda
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Is it wrong to use "wieso" instead of "warum" in this sentence?

January 4, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/wataya
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"Wieso, weshalb, warum?" are synonymes. You can use whichever you like. I personally don't like "wieso" very much because IMO it sounds less elegant than the other two, but that's just a matter of taste.

January 4, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/lindelenilda
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Thanks!

January 4, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/moodswinger
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Out of curiosity, what are the connotations of each word? "Wieso" would seem less elegant, what about the other "weshalb" and "warum"?

January 5, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/wataya
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They are completely interchangeable.

January 5, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/moodswinger
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Alright, thanks!

January 5, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/as2539
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For the alternative "Warum magst du es starken Kaffee zu trinken", why is the "es" necessary?

February 20, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/Menschenkind

That literally says: 'Why do you like it to drink strong coffee'. to like and mögen need an object or something that replaces the object (that, it, etc) to be complete. In German, that happens frequently: 'starken Kaffee zu trinken' is a subordinate clause. You need one of those every time you want to describe more than just an object, in this case an action. This 'it' es necessary to have a complete main clause anyway and is something like the ambassador of the sub-clause, 'es' is whatever the sub-clause later defines. That happens less often in English as far as I know, since you might say: I like talking to you – Ich mag es, mit dir zu reden. Hence, the duo's translation is also lacking a comma beteween es and starken.

February 20, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/christian
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"Warum magst du es, starken Kaffee zu trinken" sounds incredibly awkward. I wouldn't recommend using "mögen" with a verb. In most cases, it doesn't really sound natural. Use "gern" instead.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=eamLNeUhL1s

February 20, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/Menschenkind

I agree, but don't think this is completely true anyway. For example, I would prefer 'Ich mag es, im Schnee spazieren zugehen' or 'Ich mag es, mit dir so herumzuliegen' or my example above. I really wouldn't use gern there in any way. 'Ich gehe gern im Schnee spazieren' while doing that would feel awkward to me. For the Kaffee-example I agree though. Maybe etw. gern tun just sounds too sloppy or casual to me in some cases, where you consciously express your own liking.

(Ist der Rest ansonsten in Ordnung so?)

February 20, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/wataya
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Hmm, for me both 'Ich gehe gern im Schnee spazieren' and 'Ich mag es, im Schnee spazieren zu gehen' sound natural. I neither feel the first one to be sloppy nor the second one to be clumsy. The coffee example is different, though. I'd very much prefer 'Ich trinke gerne starken Kaffee' over 'Ich mag es, starken Kaffee zu trinken'. But I think we all agree about that.

February 20, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/christian
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I'd say when it doubt, use "gern".

February 20, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/as2539
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Thanks a lot for taking the time to give the complete explanation - now that I think about it, this sort of structure has come up before and I haven't really understood where it comes from.

February 20, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/Menschenkind

It is very common, you will find it everywhere, so it's important to know about it. Some more literally translated examples:

Ich weiß nicht, wie du heißt – I don't know, what your name is.

Ich habe nicht verstanden, wo das herkommt – I haven't understood, where it comes from.

Sie mag es, wie ich sie ansehe – She likes it, how I look at her.

There are many verbs in German which have to refer to something: You don't know what? You/she like/s what? You go where? Whenever the interrogative is more than just one or two words, you have this very case.

February 20, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/nphindenberg

So "Warum trinkst du starken Kaffee gern?" is wrong, but "Warum trinkst du gern starken Kaffee?" is right... Is there a grammatical reason for this preferential word order? Or does it just 'sound' better?

August 24, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/wataya
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Both are possible. "Warum trinkst du gern starken Kaffee?" is more common, though. Moving the 'gern' at the end of the sentence puts a lot of emphasis on it. If you do it unintentionally, it sounds a bit clumsy.

August 24, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/DearGeorge
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"Warum magst du starken Kaffee trinken" worked for me.

November 19, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/Tim_v_R

Why is it 'starken'. I thought the accusative adj ending when there's no article was alwaya '-e'.

April 2, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/christian
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https://www.duolingo.com/Tim_v_R

Thanks for the swift response. I guess I was confused with the rule specifically for the plural, which I suppose occurs relatively often without an article.

April 3, 2014
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