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https://www.duolingo.com/Negulon77

Cokoladan au cokoladon?

Kial "trinkas cokoladan lakton" kaj ne "cokoladon lakton"?

Why do we say "trinkas cokoladan lakton" and not "cokoladon lakton" since nouns in Esperanto end in "o"?

1 year ago

16 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/grey236
grey236
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Adjectives in Esperanto end in -a; Cokolada here is an adjective modifying Lakto so we get "Chocolate Milk". We can actually derive many adjectives from nouns as you just change the ending.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Negulon77

Dankon!

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JanPaulido
JanPaulido
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And the -n ending is also an affix , does not make a different word , but it tells you something about the way the word is being used in that sentence

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Negulon77

Dankon!

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/BerberuEsperanto

certigu vin akiri veran Ĉokoladan lakton (ne cokoladan)

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/lupevasquez

Chocolate describes what kind of milk it is. It is milk but what KIND of milk. The word that describes what kind of milk it is is an adjective and adjectives end in an -a.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Negulon77

Dankon, lupevasquez.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/mizinamo
mizinamo
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English can use nouns as modifiers to describe another noun, but Esperanto doesn't do this.

So a noun–noun compound such as "chocolate milk" turns either into adjective + noun (ĉokolada lakto) or into a close compound "ĉokoladlakton".

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Negulon77

Dankon!

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JanPaulido
JanPaulido
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Yea but even in English the "noun" chocolate in this sentence wouldn't be considered a noun as it is being used as an adjective , so it's not a noun noun combo in English , it just looks that way

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/mizinamo
mizinamo
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In English "chocolate" can be either a noun or an adjective, you're right, and IMO a case can be made for either "adjective+noun" or "noun+noun" in "chocolate cake", but in a phrase such as "carrot cake" I think it's pretty clear that "carrot" acts as a noun as I don't think you can call "carrot" an adjective.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/lupevasquez

I think it can be. Red cake Blue cake Chocolate cake Carrot cake

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/mizinamo
mizinamo
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Well, if you want to look at it that way, then you could say that every noun in English can be used as an adjective. (Much as pretty much any noun can be verbed.)

Using Latin grammar analysis for English breaks down a bit sometimes because English isn't Latin.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/BerberuEsperanto

Why RU trying to use logic in EN? As stated before it's highly idiomatic language (must remember different context). Formally the above 'adjectives' are compound nouns. But actually it comes from missing words; Chocolate [made] cake.

Cambridge International Dictionary of Idioms explains over 7,000 idioms. With 700 root EO words + rules you are already ahead.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JanPaulido
JanPaulido
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Yes but chocolate is not a noun, the word chocolate is , or can be , but, in this case though , being used as an adjective to describe a noun , it is no longer a noun , in this case , in this sentence , it is describing the noun 'cake'. Another way to look at it as Berberu put it could be a compound noun as the cake in question just happens to be chocolate the whole chocolate cake is a noun , nevertheless , chocolate is really a description :) It's funny , I had to learn Esperanto before I ever learned any proper English grammar , lol.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/BerberuEsperanto

English [language] is idiomatic [expressions that are natural to only native speaker], fill in the blanks language. Its grammar is still being discovered today.

The brain has to reconstruct the missing parts. Only the flood of media, constant use and 'learning by heart' makes this process 'easier'.

I enjoy EO due to it's much simpler logic.

1 year ago