"Mae hi'n well heddiw."

Translation:It is better today.

January 30, 2017

10 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/susanescott

How do you know this isn't "she is better today"?

January 30, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/iskraunam

Good question. I'd say because of the context, but I would appreciate someone to clarify.

February 13, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/shwmae

It could be either. There are only two third-person singular pronouns in Welsh:

hi = "she" or "it (feminine)"

(f)e/(f)o = "he" or "it (masculine)"

Context usually clears it up.

March 6, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/bXHV8mS4

I got the translation "It has better today" for this sentence. (As correction after i typed it wrong) - It sounds kind of strange. Is it used somewhere this way? (Would have expected: " It is better today".)

August 29, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/ibisc

That is an error in the central Duo system - the course team has no control over it. It seems to generalise incorrectly from "it's been = it has been" to "it's' = 'it has".

I have just changed the preferred answer here from "It's better..." to "It is better..." - that might nudge Duo in the right direction.

August 29, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/EmmaMitche89062

Thank you. That should help learners in future.

November 5, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/frenchietobe

Is well in this sentence related to english well?

March 2, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/daschaich

I think it's a coincidence. Welsh well is a mutation of gwell, and the letters are pronounced quite differently than those in English---especially the ll but also the e which comes out long in the pronunciation at https://forvo.com/word/cy/gwell/

I took a look in the Geiriadur Prifysgol Cymru, where the entry for gwell (which I can't seem to link to directly) does not have the magic "bnth. S." for "benthyg Saesneg" (borrowed from English). You can compare gwell's entry with those for siop, bacwn, ... http://welsh-dictionary.ac.uk/gpc/gpc.html

March 3, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/shwmae

Actually, Welsh gwell and English well might ultimately come from the same word: Proto-Indo-European *welh₁- "wish, desire, want". Funny that with the mutation both words look exactly the same and now share a geographic location after millennia of separation.

March 6, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/TDuff_98

"Wel" does exist in Welsh, and its generally used similarly to how "well" is used to start/conjoin sentences in English. At least from what Welsh I hear from music and videos etc.

September 18, 2018
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