https://www.duolingo.com/nicoladibrooklyn

FSI Language Difficulty List

http://www.atlasandboots.com/foreign-service-institute-language-difficulty/

I love this list.

But does anyone know of other versions for native speakers of other languages than English?

Thanks.

1 year ago

13 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/Lorel90
Lorel90
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This page has some information http://how-to-learn-any-language.com/e/languages/similarities/index.html I am not sure how the FSI got the numbers, but it has not work like that for most of us.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/nicoladibrooklyn

Cool site, thanks.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Xefjord

Just so you are aware. the FSI numbers are a little misleading, they refer to classroom numbers, so you need to double the amount of hours it takes to become fluent. I recently did the math, and with double numbers the time it takes to reach fluency sounds incredibly reasonable.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Oni
Oni
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Not necessarily. A classroom hour is not significantly different than self-study if that self-study has a feedback component and is progressively harder (not just review). In fact, many classes can be less effective than self-study. And immersion hours can also count as study as long as you get feedback.

Research shows that 26-49 hours is needed in Duolingo to pass Semester 1 Spanish. At a university, that is 48-64 hours of classtime + another 50-100 hours self-study. Duolingo's benefit drops off completely around the 3rd Semester, however. You can't go past FSI 1+ (CEFR B1) with Duo, and the scale above considers fluent to be FSI/IRL Level 3 (out of 5 levels!)

Babbel & Busuu were researched by the same professor and are about 20% more effective per hour than Duolingo! Rosetta Stone is about 50% less effective.

However, many people consider FSI/IRL Level 2, CEFR B2, & ACTFL Advanced to be "fluent" (I'm not one of them). Polyglot Benny Lewis thinks it's enough.

For the motivated, efficient, and smart, I'd say B1 takes 300 hours for category I. B2 takes 600. For IRL Level 3 (C1), it is 600 class hours + homework MAYBE.

That's enough for most people.

That said, it did not take me 4,400 hours of class time to learn Chinese and Japanese to Level 3 fluency. At least I'm pretty sure I didn't spend 50-100k on classes!

9 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Lorel90
Lorel90
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Interesting. I think to have a proven program is very important.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Kongekrabbe
Kongekrabbe
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No I don't. It's a very interesting list though! I'm just asking myself what a "cultural difference" (in contrast to a linguistic difference) between two languages might be??

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Mr_Eyl
Mr_Eyl
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It refers to the unfamiliarity of concepts across cultures which are expressed in languages- for instance, the various registers of politeness in the Japanese language, or the differences in language used when talking to very specific relatives in certain African languages.

For some really in-depth thoughts on the subject, read about the Sapir-Whorf hypothesis.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/nicoladibrooklyn

Or perhaps, that distant cultures perceive things differently and it influences their language. Where you would use the word for Light Blue to describe a color you are seeing in English, In Hebrew Tchelet (Light Blue) is perceived as a color of it's own, and I heard that in Japanese the color Pink is perceived and said as "Light Red". Maybe that's the direction but I could be wrong.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Xefjord

The color pink is ピンク (PINKU) lol so they very much have a color for it now anyways. The thing I have always heard is that blue and green used to be the same color in Japanese. Even still whenever I stop at traffic lights, the Japanese girlfriend will say "Blue light!" when she wants me to go instead of "Green light!"

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/nicoladibrooklyn

An English loanword means they very much have it in their culture? lol... That's interesting about blue/green though didn't know that!

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Hasen6
Hasen6
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Considering the shear volume of English loanwords in Japanese it would seem almost nothing is in this culture, but the truth is they just love using loanwords. For most of the objects around the house they mainly use English loanwords these days.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Tim358563

I know there's a hunter-gatherer culture in Africa whose members can't tell blue from green. Maybe it's a similar situation?

8 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/nicoladibrooklyn

My guess is that they mean Linguistic difference. ;)

1 year ago
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