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  5. "She eats."

"She eats."

Translation:Sie isst.

February 20, 2013

32 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/karan093

Why not "Sie esst"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Orynae

essen is an irregular verb. With du(you) and er/sie/es(he/she/it), the E turns into I.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/emmyk2222

"isst" is like "is eating" And "esse" is like "am eating"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/eyeaspasta

Irregular verbs are pretty weird. You just got to get used to what sounds right...

Ich esse

Du isst

Er/sie/es isst

Wir essen

Ihr esst

sie/Sie essen


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ZhangTimi

What different about the pronunciation between "isst" and "ist"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Orynae

It's the same. You just know which one it is based on the context or what comes after (the intonation might be a bit different too). If there's nothing after the verb, it's usually "isst" because normally you don't say something like "she is" all by itself :)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ZhangTimi

Thanks a lot! you do a big favor to me!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MKJ

Not even in a reply to a question as "who is here?" Can we not reply with "Sie ist"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/elizabethem

@MKJ Technically yes, but would you really answer that question so vaguely? That's a question usually answered with a name. You could answer serveral questions with just "she is" but the asker will probably ask for more information. Orynae was right in saying you wouldn't use it that often. We don't use such a simple sentence that often in English, either.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/christian

No, you can't do that in German, not even colloquially. You can reply with "Sie" or "Sie ist hier", but not "Sie ist".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MKJ

In English, we do happen to use terms such as "he/she did." Also, if we're talking to a group of people, a lot of the times we run into the situation where, the person talked about being part of the group and, hence, nearby, we receive a reply like "She/he is" accompanied by the pointing of the index finger toward that person nearby. I mean regardless of how un-often it is used, whether it is used or not is my inquiry because to say that "it isn't used often" means that, albeit rare, the sentence or term is correct and that's what we care to know here.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/elizabethem

I'm a native English speaker so you're preaching to the choir here. I did answer your question in the most basic terms, as you desired. "Technically yes." Your original example of "Who is here? " wasn't the best because someone only asks that if they cannot see who is here, hence why I said "she is" wouldn't suffice. Your second example includes pointing to the person in question. In that situation, yes, obviously you can just say "she is" because the person asking can see. The point I was trying to make was that language is situational and contextual. Regardless if you can use simple sentences, you won't unless it is appropriate for the situation, as you demonstrated with the pointing example.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/emmyk2222

"isst" is like "is eating" And "esse" is like "am eating"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/deniaklas

why is it isst and not ist?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/wudama

essen = to eat / sie isst = she eats

sein = to be / sie ist = she is


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/A.Halawani

Ist means Is isst means eats


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/El_Presidente_

sie ist eine apfel = she is an apple


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ErickMO

How can you distinguish between the two of them, phonetically speaking?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/elizabethem

Depends on what follows. If food follows, it's isst. It's pronounced the same way. Context is everything.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Plethera

I guess what they say is true - You are what you eat.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ajivani

The "s" is "isst" is slightly prolonged?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/christian

No, "ist" and "isst" sound exactly the same.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/emmyk2222

"isst" is like "is eating" And "esse" is like "am eating"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/eseegreenberd

I - ich; you - du; he/she/it - er/sie/es; we - wir; you - ihr; they - sie;


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/elizabethem

Don't forget formal Sie. You adult person who is not in my family. That's how I learned it.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/eseegreenberd

True, thanks! The verb's form remains the same as used by plural's "sie"

Zum Frühstück essen sie Brot und Milch. - For breakfast they eat bread and milk.

Zum Frühstück essen Sie Brot und Milch. - For breakfast you (formal) eat bread and milk.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SheldonLaney

So when do you use esse instead of isst?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/elizabethem

When you use ich and want to say "I eat..."


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SheldonLaney

So if it was "the" or "you" you'd put isst?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/elizabethem

If you put a noun after "the," like "The girl eats," then yes that would be correct. Essen is an irregular verb, just like "to be" in English (assuming you're a native English speaker here). Subject-verb agreement is different for every subject. When I first learned German, I got so frustrated with there not being a way to tell which verbs are irregular. Unfortunately you can't know until you learn the word. If anything about grammar gives you trouble, and this goes for everyone who might read this, I highly recommend buying a Schaum's grammar workbook from Barnes & Noble or Amazon. They are tough but fantastic, and I find physically writing things rather than typing helps with memorization. Sometimes it pays to do things with pen and paper!

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