"Pin"

Translation:Battery

February 1, 2017

10 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Vortarulo

You can tell that this one must be a loanword, because there are no original Vietnamese (and no Chinese loan-) words that start with /p/.

February 1, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SirRodericSpode

No matter how many times I listen it sounds like he is saying "Bean".

September 8, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Vortarulo

It's not really your fault. Vietnamese P, T, K/C/Q are unaspirated, which means that there is no puff of air coming out after them. If you pronounce the English word "pin", you could blow out a candle in front of your face, right. If you put your hand there, you will notice. Now say "spin" — you notice, (almost) no air coming out. That is the right sound. And if you pronounce this sound without the s- in front of it, it does sound a bit like "bin" (or "bean" maybe), because English doesn't have these unaspirated stops at the beginning of words.

September 9, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JanetHoski1

I also thought it was "bin". This explanation is really helpful. I think the difference between the Vietnamese T and the English is that the Vietnamese T is aspirated, right? And the unaspirated sound is spelled Th in Vietnamese.

April 4, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Vortarulo

The other way round: Vietnamese th is aspirated (as in English top), while Vietnamese t is unaspirated (as in English stop).

April 4, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JanetHoski1

Thank you! It is confusing because the "t" has a harsher sound, while the "th" sounds softer. But aspiration here makes for a softer sound. Since English does not have unaspirated stops at the beginning of words, both the "p" and the "t" are unfamiliar sounds to me.

April 4, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Vortarulo

Aspiration is the word for the "puff of air" that is coming out of the mouth after certain sounds. You can test it with your hand (or a candle) in front of your mouth. When you say "stop" (non-aspirated [t]), then only a little air reaches your hand or the flame, mostly from the following vowel. When you say "top" (aspirated [tʰ]), then you will notice a lot of air that might even extinguish the flame.

So actually Vietnamese t should sound softer. The word tôi should sound quite similar to "doy", while thôi would sound almost identical to English "toy".

April 5, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Songve

To me it's a cross between a P and B. When I close my eyes and listen, it is clearer. That's what I do when I have trouble hearing a sentence. So far, the eyes closed method has worked on all but one so far.

April 7, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SanDigital

Is this from the French word for battery, pile?

November 21, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Vortarulo

Yes, exactly.

November 21, 2018
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