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"Free entry"

Translation:Entrée libre

February 21, 2013

29 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Ronnie-JA

L'entrée gratuite isn't accepted


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/zzyss

Maybe that is specifically "the (this particular) entry is free". However, I'm a bit confused: is "entrée" a noun, verb, or gerund?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Ronnie-JA

No verb in my attempt. Just a noun + adjective. Other examples I've seen include:

  • Gratuit pour tous;
  • [La] Libre entrée;
  • Accès libre;
  • Accès gratuit;
  • Entreé gratuite

But if you can have le billet gratuit, why not l'entrée [feminine noun] gratuite?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/coloraday

Could it also be, 'Admission gratuite', please?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Sitesurf

yes, in specific context (school)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Tamtrung

Why is the determiner left here?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/deeptendu

Because of the BANGS rule. Beauty, age, number, goodness/badness, size (ex gross) adjectives come before the noun.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/laliga

it can'te be "gratuite"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/laliga

didn't accept mine...


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/greatlanguages

Why not: Acces gratuit (with accent) ??


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Sitesurf

entry - entrée access - accès


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/slystad

Strange - here it accepts 'gratuite' for 'free'. Earlier I was supposed to translate from English, and it didn't accept that. Not quite sure how to report that one...


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/knede99

why is it not des entree libre


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Sitesurf

"des" is a plural article, to be used with a plural noun: une entrée libre, des entrées libres

In this case, "entrée libre" is something you could find written on a sign at the entrance of an exhibition or other event. In such case, no article is needed.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Gavier

I'm surprised that 'Libre' is accepted. 'Gratuite' yes but I didn't think 'Libre' could be used to mean 'free of charge'


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Diplospouse

I don't think "Entrée libre" would mean free of charge, but rather free of impediment. For example, someone whose passport entitled them "free entry" into a country.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Sitesurf

No, "entrée libre" means you have nothing to pay for visiting a place.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Diplospouse

Thanks! I had thought the two words were totally different concepts in French. Is it fair to say we can use either to mean "free of charge" (with gratuit being more common) but that when we talk about freedom in some other sense we need to say libre?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Sitesurf

"libre" means "free" but never "free of charge" in money terms.

All other usages are the same as in English.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Sitesurf

"entrée libre " is specific and does mean "free of charge".

But adjective "libre" in any other context means "free" and not "free of charge".

To mean "free of charge" in any other context, you can use "gratuit, gratuite, gratuits, gratuites."


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Gavier

Now I am confused! You have nothing to pay - but not free of charge? So free in what sense? The only other sense I can imagine is the one already given by Diplospouse but you say that's not correct.

Sorry if I'm being unusually dense! :-)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Gavier

ahhhhhh ok. Entrée libre is a special case. Got it, thanks!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Gori16

why does the hover over drop down thing only suggest "gratuit" for free, and not also "gratuite". Misleading.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/n6zs
  • 2029

It's only a hint for a single word, not necessarily for the given context. So you will have to determine if it is modifying a masculine noun or a feminine noun and adjust accordingly.

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