"Ele foi colega de faculdade do meu filho."

Translation:He was my son's college mate in college.

February 21, 2013

21 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/vivalahumanidad

The hints are a bit misleading. I interpreted them as "colleague at the same faculty" or something similar.

February 21, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/erudis
  • 25
  • 22
  • 21
  • 14
  • 10
  • 6
  • 4
  • 2091

"Colega" means simply colleague, roommate is someone who shares a room, so you would say "colega de quarto". This translation is wrong.

February 21, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/diegopmelo
  • 18
  • 16
  • 16
  • 11
  • 7

Classmate can be a colleague?

April 25, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/gpriddy
  • 20
  • 20
  • 17
  • 15
  • 14
  • 11
  • 11
  • 10
  • 10
  • 10
  • 5
  • 3
  • 3
  • 3

I translated it as : "He was a faculty colleague of my son." My question is: If I really wanted to say that, what would it be in Portuguese?

June 14, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/Oinophilos
Plus
  • 18
  • 17
  • 14
  • 12
  • 12
  • 11
  • 11
  • 10
  • 10
  • 8
  • 8
  • 7
  • 6
  • 5
  • 4
  • 4
  • 4
  • 3
  • 2
  • 2
  • 2

Good question. This English sentence means they were both professors on the same faculty (i.e. instructional staff). How would that be made clear in Portuguese?

February 11, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/tillmanf

In american english, no one would say 'college mate'. The correct word would be classmate.

May 16, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/19appleblossom63

I agree, we would not use the terms college mate or school mate.

May 11, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/DanielFenn5

This is a horrible sentence in British English too. I wonder if there is actually a dialect in which it doesnt sound bizarre.

November 24, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/gerry11111
  • 15
  • 13
  • 12
  • 5

I also interpreted faculdade incorrectly. I am used to the spanish word facultad, which normally means "faculty" as in the professors working in a particular department or college. Can faculdade in portuguese also refer to the unviersity/college as a whole?

May 9, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/diegopmelo
  • 18
  • 16
  • 16
  • 11
  • 7

Yes gwezito, "faculdade" can refer university/college in portuguese-Brazil, it is normally for "private colleges" but a it isn't rule..... generaly, we say " Eu fiz faculdade de Medicina".... "I did Medicine's college"....

May 9, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/Oinophilos
Plus
  • 18
  • 17
  • 14
  • 12
  • 12
  • 11
  • 11
  • 10
  • 10
  • 8
  • 8
  • 7
  • 6
  • 5
  • 4
  • 4
  • 4
  • 3
  • 2
  • 2
  • 2

More idiomatically we would say "I went to medical school." The possessive is wrong here.

January 20, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/G.P.Niers
  • 25
  • 22
  • 12
  • 10
  • 7

I have seen the ‘correct’ translation and I still don't know what it means. Any help?

May 19, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/bossanova22

I think in this situation, Americans would most likely say, "He is my son's friend from college", or if it wasn't necessarily a friendship, "He went to college with my son." Or, more formally, "He was my son's colleague in college." Now, other English speaking countries might use "mate" instead of "friend" and "university" or "uni" instead of "college".

June 3, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/emeyr
  • 25
  • 25

Yup! I wrote "He is my son's friend from college." We wouldn't use "colleague" to describe a friend from school. A colleague is more likely to describe someone from work or a fellow faculty member - and is rather formal.

February 27, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/Oinophilos
Plus
  • 18
  • 17
  • 14
  • 12
  • 12
  • 11
  • 11
  • 10
  • 10
  • 8
  • 8
  • 7
  • 6
  • 5
  • 4
  • 4
  • 4
  • 3
  • 2
  • 2
  • 2

I don't think we would say colleague. We use that exclusively for someone we work with (in a professional job in the same firm) or someone in the same profession (not a student). It's different in other languages. Here I think the best rendering is "He is a fellow student of my son's at the college."

January 20, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/pezbabel

The correct answer in English is "He was my son's college mate in college." which sounds very strange to me.

August 11, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/nqmpdj
  • 25
  • 25
  • 16
  • 10
  • 4

"He was my son's college mate" is accepted now ( 05/2018)

May 16, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/porkandcheese

Acho que a tradução nunca seria falado em inglês

October 30, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/Rennvotur
  • 25
  • 22
  • 11
  • 10
  • 9
  • 8
  • 6
  • 2

"He was my son's college mate in college"

haha, nice translation, guys.

November 13, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/JohnGrunewald
  • 25
  • 25
  • 25
  • 25
  • 24
  • 21
  • 13

I also went with "colleague" at my son's college. and got it wrong. Maybe they both worked there? I think Duo could stand to allow a bit more leeway, and also provide alternate translations. it would cut out a whole lot of this and other discussions and save us all a whole lot of time that would be better spent forging ahead. Glad I got that off my chest. How's that for an American idiom?

February 10, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/SilentAnnie

I came to: "He was my college roommate's son"

August 8, 2014
Learn Portuguese in just 5 minutes a day. For free.