https://www.duolingo.com/linkinparkSWE

position of nicht

Guten tag Leute!

I have seen several sentences with nicht at the end such as "Sie mag den Löffel nicht". But in my german class in school we/the teacher never puts nicht at the end of a sentence unless its a question " warum magst du das nicht?" so im a little confused why nicht is at the end of sie mag den Löffel nicht. anyone got an explanation? thanks!

February 4, 2017

6 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/QBoba

There is an explanation in Tips and notes:

The German "nicht" will precede adjectives and adverbs as in "Das Frühstück ist nicht schlecht" (the breakfast is not bad) and "Das Hemd ist nicht ganz blau" (the shirt is not entirely blue).

For verbs, "nicht" can either precede or follow the verb, depending the type of verb. Typically, "nicht" comes after conjugated verbs as in "Die Maus isst nicht" (the mouse does not eat). In conversational German, the perfect ("Ich habe gegessen" = "I have eaten") is often used to express simple past occurrences ("I ate"). If such statements are negated, "nicht" will come before the participle at the end of the sentence: "Ich habe nicht gegessen" (I did not eat/I have not eaten).

Finally, "nicht" also tends to come at the end of sentences (after direct objects like "mir" = "me,"" or after yes/no questions if there is just one conjugated verb). For example, "Die Lehrerin hilft mir nicht" (The teacher does not help me) and "Hat er den Ball nicht?" (Does he not have the ball?)

But it will come naturally eventually.

February 4, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/bansal.arushi11

Can someone please explain the section "Position of Nicht" in Tips & Notes. Preferably with some more examples, first with simple sentences and then adding (adverbs etc.) to the same sentences.

Also, please explain what exactly is the "sentence bracket". Can someone mark it using []

And explain: {Everything else will end up at the very end. The rest of the sentence (for example, adverbs), will appear between this 'sentence bracket'. }

Thank you

February 18, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/person243

You put "nicht" before the thing you want to negate, except for the finite verb, to negate that you have to put the "nicht" as far to the end as possible (before separable prefix or infinitive/past participle). I like to look at it by putting in the word with the opposite meaning to understand what you want to negate. Take your example without "nicht":

"Ich mag den Löffel." = "I like the spoon."

"Ich mag (jeden Löffel nur) nicht den Löffel." = "I like (every spoon but) not this spoon."

"Ich mag den Löffel nicht." = "I dislike the spoon."

You often want to negate the adverbs or for general statements you want to negate the nouns (here you often need to use a form of "kein"), but likewise you often want to negate the sense of the verb, which sends "nicht" to the end.

Another example to illustrate that the position of "nicht" can also change the meaning:

"Ich schlafe nachts." = "I sleep at night."

"Ich schlafe nachts nicht." = "I am awake at night." (can't sleep)

"Ich schlafe nicht nachts." = "I sleep at daytime." (work at night)

"Nicht ich schlafe nachts." = "It's not me who sleeps at night." (you are the one)

"Nicht ich schlafe nachts nicht, nicht?" = "It's not me who can't sleep at night, isn't it?" (this is just to confuse you (; )

I hope I could be of help.

February 4, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/Jan_Osch

"Ich mag (jeden Löffel nur) nicht den Löffel." = "I like (every spoon but) not this spoon."

"Ich mag den Löffel nicht." = "I dislike the spoon."

Sorry, but that's not right. "Ich mag nicht den Löffel." is not a good sentence. "Mag" is a modal verb and it shouldn't stand without another verb in this case. E. g. "Ich mag nicht den Löffel benutzen." - I like forks or anything else but not a spoon. So, you negate the using of a spoon. The better sentence is: Ich mag keinen Löffel.

"Ich mag den Löffel nicht." is correct. You don't need another verb. You also can say: "Ich mag diesen Löffel nicht." - I don't like this spoon.

February 7, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/person243

"Was hältst du von diesem Löffel?" - "Ich mag den Löffel nicht."

"Ich mag beide Löffel." - "Wirklich? Also, ich mag zwar diesen Löffel hier, aber nicht den Löffel; der ist scheußlich."

You need a bit more to the sentence here to make the other position of "nicht" sound natural, but it can work. The meaning changes of course, that is what I wanted to express.

February 7, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/ForUsCuber

I believe the reason why "nicht" is going the the end of the examples that you provided is because it is negating the verb "to like".

From the notes for the "Not" skill: "Adverbs go in different places in different languages. You cannot simply place the German adverb "nicht" where you would put "not" in English.

The German "nicht" will precede adjectives and adverbs as in "Das Frühstück ist nicht schlecht" (the breakfast is not bad) and "Das Hemd ist nicht ganz blau" (the shirt is not entirely blue).

For verbs, "nicht" can either precede or follow the verb, depending the type of verb. Typically, "nicht" comes after conjugated verbs as in "Die Maus isst nicht" (the mouse does not eat). In conversational German, the perfect ("Ich habe gegessen" = "I have eaten") is often used to express simple past occurrences ("I ate"). If such statements are negated, "nicht" will come before the participle at the end of the sentence: "Ich habe nicht gegessen" (I did not eat/I have not eaten).

Finally, "nicht" also tends to come at the end of sentences (after direct objects like "mir" = "me,"" or after yes/no questions if there is just one conjugated verb). For example, "Die Lehrerin hilft mir nicht" (The teacher does not help me) and "Hat er den Ball nicht?" (Does he not have the ball?)".

I hope this was of some assistance :)

February 4, 2017
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