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https://www.duolingo.com/DragonPolyglot

"Conlang" - short film by Ben Wood

DragonPolyglot
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A short 20-minute documentary-like film with the topic of Constructed Languages and the role they play in subcultures and linguistic understanding, featuring David Peterson (creator of Dothraki) and Paul Frommer (creator of Na'vi), among several other linguists and conlangers.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YVs5--zgANE

What are your thoughts on conlangs? Did this opinion change after you saw this video? Are you interested in learning a conlang? If so, why and which one(s)? Have you ever tried to create a language? If so, why did you start to create it?

1 year ago

5 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/Ayato_Hisakawa

Hmm yeah I like them. I tried creating a language when I was a kid because me and my friend had a crush on someone, so we wanted to keep it a secret from the person, and everyone else. =^_^=

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/only_human
only_human
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I have a few ideas that I've toyed with. This video has gotten me more interested. When I was a kid, some educators tried to sell my school district a speed reading method. During their spiel they flashed an image of a number and asked what it was... people couldn't say because too much time was wasted counting the digits to be able say it with its magnitude; then these guys pitched their snake oil and showed a flash of the phrase "in the window," which is extremely easy to recognize by configuration and not at all due to their purported mental techniques. I feel that numbers should be better integrated with language.

I was interested to hear in this video about a conlang that draws on Korean numbers in some way and am curious enough to look further.

I've also think that the the shapes of Hangul letters indicating vowels and some speech articulation is pretty cool.

I've been impressed with Japanese onamontapoea as used in manga and elsewhere and would like to borrow some ideas from there if I ever did my own tinkering. I like the idea of small frontal vowels indicating something is small and voiced consonants indicating large things, plosives for sudden things, etc.

I had never heard of Hayfield. I took some sign language classes and read William Stokoe's research on the grammar and I have some interests in this area too.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Zerr_
Zerr_
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https://www.duolingo.com/psionpete
psionpete
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I can understand the fascination of creating a conlang as it gives an insite on how and why languages developed etc.

However, I cannot understand why some people wish to learn conlangs unless they wish to get work on the sets of Game of Thrones or StarTrek or whatever.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Zerr_
Zerr_
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It's for the same reason a lot of the people with 10+ languages on Duolingo are learning languages: pure interest and fun.

I never had any reason to learn Esperanto besides my interest in its history, but if i hadn't, I never would've started learning languages for want to.

1 year ago