Duolingo is the most popular way to learn languages in the world. Best of all, it's 100% free!

https://www.duolingo.com/kristinemc

Happy National Grammar Day! :)

March 4th is National Grammar Day!
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/National_Grammar_Day

More clever grammar shirts in this article.. http://www.buzzfeed.com/juliegerstein/19-super-smart-tees-to-celebrate-national-grammar-day

Now, to get in the spirit, share your best grammar tips with all of us in the comments below. :)

4 years ago

31 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/_Fulvius

Fun fact: March Fourth is the only date that is also a sentence :3 what a coincidence :D

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Samsta
Samsta
  • 17
  • 16
  • 12

The only problem is that it would have to be "forth," not "fourth," to be a sentence.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AlmogL
AlmogL
  • 25
  • 20
  • 10

That's why it's not National Spelling Day.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MystyrNile
MystyrNile
  • 14
  • 8
  • 7
  • 5
  • 4
  • 3

It also would have to be "march"(like mark) not "March"(like Mars). Perhaps more accurate would be "that is homophonic with a sentence".

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/roodvuur

How about March first? That appears to be a real sentence :-)

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/novicplay

March First should be a sentence but not March Fo'u'rth.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/josiah_elder

Haha, it's the only date on the calendar that is a VERB...

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/annika_a
annika_a
  • 22
  • 17
  • 17
  • 16
  • 11
  • 11
  • 5
  • 2
  • 2
  • 2

You would have had me ... but for "should of".

(I know, not really a tip, but another t-shirt idea.)

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/bibliobibulous

YES! YES! YEEESSS! :D I greeted all my friends with a "Happy National Grammar Day!" today. All I got were some withering looks and multiple people saying that no, it's Pancake Day. . . If I were to share one of my (myriad and usually unwelcome) grammar tips with the world, it would be the fact that "everyday" is only an adjective, not an adverb. Often people use it where they mean "every day" -- as the adverb. I see this almost every day! :)

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Puddleglum
Puddleglum
  • 16
  • 9
  • 9
  • 8
  • 7
  • 5
  • 3
  • 3

This is now my second favorite day of the year! Right behind Hitchhiker's Day. :-D

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/GEONERD4

One of my favorites is Pi Day (March 14). If only I were alive in 1592...

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Ricaloca

Don't forget Star Wars Day - May 4. May the fourth be with you!

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/raans
raans
  • 25
  • 25
  • 19
  • 16
  • 16
  • 16
  • 14
  • 13
  • 12
  • 11
  • 1801

Awesome! As to the sharing: No article in Spanish after the verb of not having a thing: "no tengo coche". (surely not the best one!)

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Samsta
Samsta
  • 17
  • 16
  • 12

I didn't know about this. I need to add this to my list of favorite days. :D

GRAMMAR TIP: "Me and my brother went to the store" is incorrect. Let's remove the other person ("and my brother") from the sentence: "Me went to the store." Clearly we must replace "me" with "I," and you usually place "I" after the other subject, so: "My brother and I went to the store"

GRAMMAR TIP 2: "There's two dogs" is incorrect. That would be using a plural subject, "dogs," with the third person singular of "to be," "is". So we get: "Dogs is." That's clearly not right, so we say "Dogs are." Therefore, we must say "There are two dogs".

EDIT: If you want to see a funny grammar video, ask me for it on my stream. Be warned, some people consider it offensive.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/saschambaer
saschambaer
  • 12
  • 7
  • 6
  • 5
  • 5
  • 4
  • 3
  • 2

However, the second one does not apply to German, where dogs would not be the subject but instead an accusative-object: Es hat / gibt zwei Hunde.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Samsta
Samsta
  • 17
  • 16
  • 12

It's similar in Spanish:

Había un perro = There was a dog
Había perros = There were dogs

Although it is a very common mistake to use, for example, "habían" (you add the "n" to verbs conjugated to the third person plural), but it should always remain in the third person singular because "los perros" isn't the subject.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/adamyoung97
adamyoung97
  • 15
  • 15
  • 15
  • 14
  • 13
  • 13
  • 12
  • 10
  • 9
  • 8
  • 8

And where people say "There's less ..." it should be "There are fewer ..."

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Don_It
Don_It
  • 24
  • 12
  • 1731

Unless they are talking about a non-countable-noun, e.g. "there's less water" or "there's less time".

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MystyrNile
MystyrNile
  • 14
  • 8
  • 7
  • 5
  • 4
  • 3

I think languages are funner when they go unconstrained by rules that don't have a reason to be there for. There's all these things that you can say in English that don't cause misunderstanding, but people still be tryna stop you from sayin it, and that ain't right, IMO.

And have you ever heard anyone say "I and X <verb phrase>"? I have concluded that the word "me" is used as the subject when it is the first in a list of subjects, and is also the basic form of the pronoun that is typically used when it has no obvious verb phrase to be associated with (eg "I <verb phrase>" "Me too"), although that is ambiguous as to whether it is the subject or the verb.

Languages are built on subconscious rules. The rules people teach/enforce are only observations.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Samsta
Samsta
  • 17
  • 16
  • 12

No, I haven't heard "I and X <verb>" (which is incorrect, I believe), but I have heard "X and I <verb>." You should always have "I" after the other subject(s).

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MystyrNile
MystyrNile
  • 14
  • 8
  • 7
  • 5
  • 4
  • 3

Why?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Samsta
Samsta
  • 17
  • 16
  • 12

Because that's how we do it. I could ask you, "Why do we use 'why' instead of something like 'For what?' similarly to Spanish?" "Well, that's just how it is." We could sit here asking "Why?" all day.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MystyrNile
MystyrNile
  • 14
  • 8
  • 7
  • 5
  • 4
  • 3

Likewise, "me & xsub1, xsub2 ... xsubn" is how me and millions of other people do it.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JennaHO
JennaHO
  • 21
  • 4
  • 2
  • 2
  • 2

I did not know about this day. I will definitely be celebrating it every year. Time to go fix everyone's grammar on Facebook and make people mad! I have an excuse now. Thank you! Here are the most common mistakes that I absolutely despise.

Their - belonging to [them] There - a location/statement They're - a contraction of they are

Where - a location Were - used after a plural in place of was

A lot - self-explanatory. Not alot.

Would have, should have, could have. NOT Would of.

Many - used when the noun is countable EX: I have many bottles. Much - used when the noun is not countable. EX: I have this much water left.

Accept - To receive, or come to terms with. EX: Will you please accept my gift? Except - To exclude from a group. EX: I love fruit except for tomatoes!

I have MUCH more to say, but I will end up using the entire page. Thanks for listening! Practice safe grammar and use a comma!

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/roodvuur

Or affect / effect. Something doesn't effect you, it affects you.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/maybee476

Comma is a good thing, but I never knew how to use it in English. Any advice?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JennaHO
JennaHO
  • 21
  • 4
  • 2
  • 2
  • 2

Well I'm not good at teaching, but I will give it a go. Firstly, you use commas when you use a person's name in a sentence. Such as, "Good morning, Maybee!" Also right before a quotation as I just did. You also use it after listing items. I like wolves, tigers, elephants and monkeys. You used your comma well by the way. The comma is most often used after also, although, though and before but. It can turn two sentences into one with the proper wording. Such as your first sentence. You could have written it this way: "A comma is a good thing. I never knew how to use it in English." Though, it actually sounds better as one. Hope this helped! As I said, I'm not the greatest teacher. If anyone has something better to add, go right ahead. Just remember this: Know the difference between, "Let's eat kids!" and "Let's eat, kids!"

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/GEONERD4

When listing things, wouldn't you write, "I like wolves, tigers, elephants, and monkeys" instead of "I like wolves, tigers, elephants and monkeys". I could easily be wrong; please let me know if I am!

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Puddleglum
Puddleglum
  • 16
  • 9
  • 9
  • 8
  • 7
  • 5
  • 3
  • 3

Both ways are correct. I prefer using the serial comma (also known as the Oxford comma. It's the comma used before and in lists) because, to me, it makes sentences flow better. It can create ambiguity, but not using a serial comma can as well. In my experience, where the serial comma is ambiguous, so is the other (please don't quote lists of examples; I know). So in short, it's personal preference, though the serial comma is controversial.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MystyrNile
MystyrNile
  • 14
  • 8
  • 7
  • 5
  • 4
  • 3

And why shouldn't "a lot" be contracted to "alot"?

Since it's used as if it were a single word, it should probably be spelt as such.

4 years ago