https://www.duolingo.com/BryanBravo4

When should I use "Have got"?

I already know that it´s the original variant of "to have" for British people but in some texts I see they use both, for instance: "(...) we have barbecues ....... we´ve got a simming pool at our house. Perhaps Is a mass matter or what?

1 year ago

22 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/The_Alison
The_Alison
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Hmm, on further research I have remembered that "have" can have two meanings.

1. possess, own, or hold. "he had a new car and a boat" synonyms: possess, own, be in possession of, be the owner of;

2. experience; undergo. "I went to a few parties and had a good time" synonyms: experience, encounter, face, meet, find, run into, go through, undergo

"Have got" would only be used in the first case.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/The_Alison
The_Alison
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The phrase "we have barbecues" would probably fall under the second definition, as barbecues are an event that you host, and therefore "we have got barbecues" wouldn't really make sense.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/grey236
grey236
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However one can also say: We've got barbecues here, implying that 'barbecues' exist/are in the area.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/adder3
adder3
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I am English and agree with The_Alison. But when I see American translations got (and gotten) seem to be used differently. So I suppose it depends on where you come from (live) as to how it would be used.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/b05aplmun.ca
b05aplmun.ca
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I'm an American and many of the examples of "have got" given here sound not quite natural to me. We would, however, use "have gotten" as the present perfect conjugation of "to get":

"Did you get the meat for the barbeque?"

"Yes, I've gotten the meat."

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/juryrigging
juryrigging
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And as a Brit I often get told off by my granddad if I use "gotten" because it's an "Americanism".

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/piguy3
piguy3
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You can invite ole gramps to take the matter up with the Bard ;)

OK, couldn't get the link to search results to work. Just type "gotten" and you should find five results, four essentially in keeping with modern usage: http://www.opensourceshakespeare.org/concordance/

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/grey236
grey236
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I'm from Texas and I'd just completely omit 'have -ten' in your sentence. So it'd just be: "Yes, I got the meat". I don't really ever use have gotten unless I'm receiving the action or for a subject compliment; e.g. I've gotten better or I've gotten yelled at before, etc.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/emeyr
emeyr
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Irregular verb: get, got, gotten (= become, obtain, receive)

I have gotten better since I started taking this medication. (present perfect: past ->> present)

I got better as soon as I started taking that medication. simple past

Some learners of AmE don't understand that "have gotten" doesn't mean "possession" as do "have" and "have got" - both of which are in the simple present tense.

"Gotten" is an old form of English that fell into disuse in BrE. It has the same root as "forgotten", "misbegotten"...

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/adder3
adder3
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Yes that 's what I mean, it all depends where you are in the world, gotten is not natural to me because I'm English. The Oxford English dictionary says. "As past participles of get, got and gotten both date back to Middle English. The form gotten is not used in British English but is very common in North American English. In North American English, got and gotten are not identical in use. Gotten usually implies the process of obtaining something, as in he had gotten us tickets for the show, while got implies the state of possession or ownership, as in I haven't got any money".

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/BryanBravo4

Interesting discussion between you and grey236, but where in United States are you from?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/BryanBravo4

Thank you for your answers, they helped me.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/The_Alison
The_Alison
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I'm pretty sure "have" and "have got" can be used interchangeably.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/idkhbtfm
idkhbtfm
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At least for northeastern Americans, they can't without sounding a bit odd. If someone said 'I have got an apple,' it sounds a bit weird compared to 'I have an apple.'

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/piguy3
piguy3
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Yeah, in the U.S. this strikes me as being essentially a mandatory contraction: "I've got" sounds fine; "I have got" sounds weird.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/emeyr
emeyr
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It is almost a mandatory affirmative construction in both languages because it is essentially informal.

Edit: There is a preference for the contracted form "I've got" in lieu of "I have got".

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/piguy3
piguy3
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? both languages? In the US at least there's nothing almost mandatory about "'ve got"; plain "have" is perfectly common in speech and "have got" uncontracted strikes me as basically always and everywhere odd. I first saw it on grammar worksheets for students learning English in Argentina and stared at it and stared at it until I made my German friend help them with it b/c it was something he'd at least seen before.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/emeyr
emeyr
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I wasn't referring to the use of "I have". I was referring to using "I've got" rather than "I have got". It has to do with the basic demands of rhythm and cadence in English.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/emeyr
emeyr
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To express possession only:

I have a Japanese car. = I've got a Japanese car. Both constructions are used in AmE and in BrE.

I've got has a more emphatic use in AmE.

Decades ago, it was far more common to use "have you got" in questions in BrE and "do you have" in AmE. Because of the influence of US media in Britain, "do you have" is now the preferred form in BrE, too. That change occurred before the eighties.

Ngrams - Corpus of English: BrE 2009

http://tinyurl.com/jvppzoy

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/BryanBravo4

Thank you!

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MasonBrooks_25

Maybe you can use "I have got".

1 year ago
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