"Je veux voir un oiseau."

Translation:I want to see a bird.

February 22, 2013

12 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/americanu197
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useful for when i am buying chicken off the black market

September 11, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/mathwizard1232
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Surely you'd ask specifically for chicken in that case. ;-p

February 17, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/KamilFox
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I sometimes think veux and voudrais mean the same thing- am I wrong for thinking this?

February 22, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/drockalgzemoser
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Sitesurf speaks the truth. They're both vouloir; it's a tense of you will learn later. "I want" vs. "I would like".

May 11, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/melai9ne

I agree with this in French but I'm not sure "want" and "would like" are so different in English. Just a matter of politeness/formality?

May 20, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/drockalgzemoser
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Yes. The conditional tense (in English and French) is normally used to discuss something that "would" happen if another thing "were" possible (ie, the conditions were favorable). Sometimes it adds a degree of politeness, implying that "if you so please" (making the conditions favorable), I.... [verb].

I would like a baguette vs I want a baguette.

Also...

I would purchase a baguette if I had the money. J'ach├Ęterais une baguette si j'avais l'argent.

May 23, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/melai9ne

Thank you, actually super helpful! I had been complaining about this one for a while, haha, but this makes sense to me.

May 23, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/Sitesurf
Mod
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No, you are not wrong. The French use "voudrais" (conditional) as a polite expression of a will.

February 22, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/Ahnaqsh
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I remember once reading a personal account that went like this.

A child was born in prison. It was born to a woman who had been brought there and kept there as a hostage until her husband turned himself in. She was constantly raped, and eventually bore a child. The hild grew up with its mother in her cell. One day, a guard took a littl epity on it and brought it to the cell of a famous opposition member, who was also a writer. The guard asked the senior prisoner to read the child a story.

The man looked at the little child and started telling it a stroy about a sheperd. The child aksed what a sheperd was, and the man ended up giving up on the story when he realized the child had never seen a sheep. He ended up telling the child a stroy about a bird. The child could relate to the bird more, because although it had never seen a bird before, it still could hear them outside the prison sometimes.

"I want to see a bird".

December 9, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/o.borsikova
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could it be - i wanna see a bird -, or my english is just bad? :)

December 28, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/Sitesurf
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"wanna" is not proper English, please write "want to"

December 29, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/jakos05
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Vouloir can also be to wish, surely?

August 12, 2013
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