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https://www.duolingo.com/Luis

Girl uses gibberish to show how languages sound to non-speakers

LuisPlus
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I thought this was funny :) She's just making up most of the words but she sounds pretty good: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ybcvlxivscw

4 years ago

83 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/saminman
saminman
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4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Thoughtdiva

I think she is totally brilliant - but the Australian English: what was that??!! Is that how it sounds to non-Australians? I admire her for trying -it seems like the hardest accent for people to do. Even Meryl Streep couldn't get it right...

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/nihowdy

As an American working in an Australian mall right now, Australian English isn't even an English language anymore, I swear. It's in a league of its own! Your slang is tough!

Edit: I've now watched the video, that is exactly what Australian English sounds like! Haha!

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/orangeant86
orangeant86
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I hear too much of an American accent when she is trying to sound Aussie, but I guess that's unavoidable. It might also help if she did throw in some Aussie slang haha

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/seelian
seelian
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lol, the chinese part totally is a failed one. xD

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Titilolo3

I agree

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ElOtroMiqui
ElOtroMiqui
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This one is also very interesting, how English souns to non-native speakers.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Vt4Dfa4fOEY

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Lrtward
Lrtward
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One of my all time favorites! I just love it - the music, the dancing, the 1960's feel, the energy.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SaxyLady
SaxyLadyPlus
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Gotta love how gibberish made for a #1 hit. ;)

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/patbo
patbo
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Yes, that one is really nice. I wonder if something like it exists for German.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/yonoleo
yonoleo
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Spanish words she did not make up: "mierda," "lugar" and "a huevo cabrón." All of them pretty necessary if you ask me.

On a serious note, it has been strange to go from hearing just noise to actually understanding (some of) what is said when I hear people speaking German. All thanks to Duo.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/EricRohnen

It's confusing to discover that most people think that speaking Spanish properly requires a curse word in every sentence, if not more! That never happens in formal conversations, and even with people you are familiar with, using such a language depends mostly on your cultural background, your country amongst the Spanish world, and even the particular region you were raised in (in Spain alone, there are big differences regarding this topic), much like any other language. I won't say we have no rude words (we may actually have a very rich lexicon, or richer than other languages) but it's unsettling that the stereotype has come to include these word.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Ontalor
Ontalor
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I understand how the stereotype can get upsetting, but in the US up until recently you were seriously fined for using swear words, which is why everything got bleeped out, and in China in most circles the idea of swearing is so beyond most people that they combine harmless words, such as 'I go!' as a kind of fake swear. I think most people understand obviously not everyone swears, but the Spanish speaking world is much more relaxed about swearing than any other culture I've studied.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/orangeant86
orangeant86
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Obviously you haven't come here to Australia yet haha

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Ontalor
Ontalor
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I was referring to the fact that you couldn't swear on TV. I swear like a sailor, but you don't expect it in most media. Spanish TV shows on the other hand are filled with swear words.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/idshanks
idshanks
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Haha, Spanish TV shows sound much more like British TV shows than the US ones do! Quite amusing. :P

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/HeneryDoDs

I would like to point out that she was not speaking properly, she was deliberately trying to speak as much gibberish as possible. It's probably the fact that most people learn the swear words of a language first. For example I know how to swear like a French Canadian, because I have worked with so many French Canadians and swearing is kinda a part of my field (construction). Do I know any other French words, no, but if I were to try and pretend to speak french, I would probably throw in the few curse words I know. It's the same with Spanish, many people have probably only been exposed to the curse words, therefore their gibberish will include the bad words.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/FrankySka
FrankySka
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lol, too funny. Especially how she gets the intonation made my day!

(but seriously: "girl"? I was expecting a 10 year old! She is at least a teenager, if not a (young) woman XD.).

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Samsta
Samsta
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"Girl" is very flexible in English; you could use it for a baby all the way up to some adults. Personally, I was expecting someone of her age.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/FrankySka
FrankySka
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I know. I just don't agree with it :-) But I don't want to get all political here - just could not help mentioning it!

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/yonoleo
yonoleo
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I agree with you. I think the rule should be: if you would not use "boy" don't use "girl."

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/chilvence
chilvence
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There isn't a hard and fast rule here. It varies from place to place. Where I'm from, "woman" can almost be condescending, as in "There's some woman at the door trying to sell something". The same goes for 'man' incidentally, I can say "how's it going man" but not "look at that man over there". It is just far too impersonal. If I was being respectful I would say 'lady' and if I was being friendly, I would say 'girl'. In other places, I might sound ridiculously quaint on one side and over familiar on the other. But I don't think of the word 'girl' as a diminutive, in fact I find the term 'young lady' far more belittling. And believe it or not, people still call me 'boy' sometimes even though I'm 30. Although it sounds more like 'bey'...

Anyway the point is, best not to assume people mean disrespect, because local habits may vary.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/FrankySka
FrankySka
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as I said below: I did not think Luis meant it negatively. This is a complex issue though, and I thing this is not the right place for this discussion, so I will stop here! :-)

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/arekolek
arekolek
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So what is a better female equivalent for "guy" than a "girl"?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/idshanks
idshanks
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I have to say 'young woman' and 'young lady' both sound very condescending where I'm from (they are old-fashioned terms generally, and are also used by school-teachers to tell off girls). They are seen as terms ('young man', too) used by older people to diminish a person's credibility or belittle their effort. 'Girl' doesn't have any of those overtones. We would tend to prefer simply woman or girl, the former tends to go with more formal contexts and the latter with more casual ones and conveys more of a friendly tone ('lady' also has negative connotations on its own). It should also be noted that 'boy' is used similarly here, though I see that from what others have said it isn't so much elsewhere (something I wasn't aware of).

Dialectal connotations are far too varied from region-to-region for people to start applying political beliefs to the language as a whole. It's akin to this whole 'people-of-colour' terminology that websites like Upworthy (people who are trying to carry the flag for political correctness) have been using so much recently; I don't know why it seems to be such a favoured term in North America, because it simply doesn't fly here! ('simply doesn't fly' is a huge understatement to describe just how inflammatory it is to some of my friends)

The internet is a big place, and English is a highly-spread and therefore highly-varied language!

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/wazzie
wazzie
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@FrankySka
Personally, not a fan of young lady. It sounds very condescending when used towards someone older than 10 (in my opinion, of course)

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/FrankySka
FrankySka
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Why specify gender to begin with? Nothing wrong with the word 'person' ;).

Edit: But I would prefer young woman or young lady if you must! Girl it's just very diminutive. (I know that is not how Luis meant it.)

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/yonoleo
yonoleo
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The word "guy" has no female equivalent. "Woman" and "young woman" work fine, though. You can keep using the word "girl" but I know that some women do not like it; I see their point and I agree with it.

Edit: I don't mean you personally. I meant it in general.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/FrankySka
FrankySka
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@ wazzie and idshanks.

Point taken; young lady can be very diminutive as well - though in the context in which Luis it would have used I would not have minded. So my favs are 'person' (for many reasons) followed by (young) woman.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SoniaLoram

What about "gal"?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/TheLizzyIzzi

I think it's fine. "Young woman makes goofy youtube video" is way to formal of a title.

If someone is truly using girl to diminish any woman then I'd be all over him or her. But unless that's the case, I'd rather see people relax on the pc-ness.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/FrankySka
FrankySka
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I do think it is more of a society level problem though: we refer to woman as (dependent, helpless, needing to be supervised - these are the negative connotations that come to mind immediately) girls. That is the issue I have with the term.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Criculann
Criculann
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But it's still better than the German word for girl, a neuter noun. Wouldn't be that bad though if the girl wasn't referred to as an "it" in the following sentence. Every time I see this I'd like to run amok. Because of that I refuse to say stuff like "Schülerinnen und Schüler" (female students and (male) students) instead of simply "Schüler".

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/FrankySka
FrankySka
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But Schuelerinnen is not neuter! ;-) "Das Mädchen" does not bother me a lot - it is grammatical gender, which I can see as a different thing. It is also das Baby, der Tisch and die Lampe. :-).

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Criculann
Criculann
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I think you didn't understand what I wanted to say :) I know that this is a grammatical gender and I'm fine with it. This is definitely not a proposal to change the grammatical gender of a word. What annoys me is this stuff: Das Mädchen ging ins Haus. Es sah sich nach seiner Mutter um. (The girl entered the house. It looked for its mother). Whenever I see something like this I think, "Why? Just why?". The grammatical gender of "Mädchen" is neuter, yes, but we all know that a girl is female. So why can't we just write "sie", "ihr(e)(en)" (she, her)? Is this seriously so hard?

And I didn't mean to say "Schülerinnen" is neuter. I meant I refuse to write or say more to express the same thought for the sake of gender equality as long as a girl is referred to as an "it". Sorry if this wasn't clear.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/FrankySka
FrankySka
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ah thanks for clarifying this. It is interesting though, because not saying Schuelerinnen will likely have the effect that female students feel excluded. In fact, it is considered pc to always add the innen (often Schueler/Innen), or to make a statement at the beginning of a written document that clearly states, that this will be omitted for readability. So while I see your point, it is interesting that for German native speakers, this is perceived very differently. As a side note - this is so ingrained in a German speakers thinking, that I always assume the person talked about is male when someone uses the English term 'friend', 'student'. etc. (because they sound more similar to Freund and Student than Freundin and Studentin).

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Criculann
Criculann
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Just as a side note, I myself am a German native speaker ;) But I've never heard anyone saying "Schülerinnen und Schüler" except in formal contexts. If I write a text I also often only write "Schüler" (though also "SchülerInnen"). I simply feel it's such a hypocrisy when everyone tries to be "politically correct" and still calls a girl an "it".

Oh and the problem with the English terms... I always have a little moment of surprise when I hear/read something like "You have to meet my friend. She's such a nice person." :)

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AlmogL
AlmogL
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I'm with you on this.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Druckles
Druckles
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I think it's rarer to see it used this flexibly in the context of print.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/LeMaitre
LeMaitre
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That was really good, especially the French, Italian and Spanish parts :)

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/pont
pont
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I thought the Italian was a little weak, but most of the others are brilliant -- at least the ones that I know well enough to judge.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MultiLinguAlex
MultiLinguAlex
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I laughed my ass off, absolutely brilliant :-D Italian and Spanish just made my day :-D

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Trang.
Trang.
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She was really natural like a native @.@. And the last one sounds like Thai to me

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/OjosDelMundo

Wow, she's amazing! And quite breathtaking. I think she just turned me straight. :D

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/TTANTAWY
TTANTAWY
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4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Jack.Elliot
Jack.Elliot
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Brilliant and I thought it was how I sounded to others ..

thanks

all the best

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Zass30
Zass30
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The japanese was pretty meh

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Ornella_S

The Spanish one sounded like Portuguese to me hahaha (except the ending xD )

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JoshuaBowers

Repost! ;)

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Lrtward
Lrtward
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She's brilliant :)
The comments on YouTube from folks that didn't realize she was doing gibberish are also amusing.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/hrelinho

Nice video, but for Portuguese is totally missed, my 2 cents

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/froggirl789

great idea :)

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/FrankKool
FrankKool
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I liked the follow-up she recently uploaded. "I love all languages in the world. Except Dutch. Dutch is cancer."

Made me laugh out loud. As a native Dutchman, I can't blame her. Dutch is not a pretty language.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/christian
christian
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https://www.duolingo.com/FrenchAddict7

WOW..... It's true O.O

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Gen912
Gen912
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She's really good! The Italian part is particularly funny :)

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Stigjohan
Stigjohan
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It's not even Italian, but Pizza :D

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/FrenchAddict7

What is Pizza, anyway? -.-

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/idshanks
idshanks
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Pizza (Listeni/ˈpiːtsə/, Italian pronunciation: [ˈpittsa]) is an oven-baked flat bread typically topped with a tomato sauce, cheese and various toppings. ;)

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ALoUSyUseRnaME
ALoUSyUseRnaME
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Oh my, poor you! Then you probably never tasted it before!

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/pont
pont
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Impressive! If anyone feels like some more fake Spanish, here's a less convincing but far sillier performance: http://youtu.be/ctaszjeaDK0 .

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/DanielPere528188
DanielPere528188
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People always told me portuguese sounded like russian. Now I know why.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Senlando
Senlando
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Here's a music video on what American English sounds like to those who can't understand it.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vMoK0focAFE

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Lull0000

Heh, I feel like this is how a language in general is when you're first learning it and only know a fairly small vocabulary, so you can just pick out a few words here and there, but not understand what's being said. Of course I learned English "for free", but this is pretty much how the rest of the languages I know sounded to me for the first few months.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/k0biz.a

LOL XD Dat Japanese

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/saygink
saygink
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funny but Turkish section sucks (in part 2) :) she did the sh's superb, but no Arabic h's (kha) are used in today's Turkish.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Talca
Talca
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Do you speak Turkish? To me it is one of the most unusual sounding languages. Years ago I sat in a cafe in Baltimore (USA). Next to me there was a couple having a conversation for 40+ minutes. I was tryng to figure out what language they were speaking. Finally, I asked them. Answer =Turkish!

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/saygink
saygink
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Yeah I guess it became something like that. Old turkish dialects (or Turkic languages) still contain ñ or kh like sounds and japanese-like vowel properties but the official Turkish spoken in Turkey became sui generis.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Eeveeluter

HAHAHAHAHAHHAHAHAHAHHAHAHAHH LOL! Dat is som weerd chineese, or japanesse, or manderine, either one its still funny

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/icestormwindsnow

That is hilarious! Especially when she speaks crazy UK English! LOL

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Talca
Talca
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She would be amazing doing SNL

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AlmogL
AlmogL
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That was amusing. I thought my native Hebrew in the sequel did not sound anything like Hebrew, I'm wondering if that's really what Hebrew sounds like to people! And if native speakers of the other languages thought the same about their languages. Also, yes, this is inevitably a little racist and stereotypical. Even if she didn't mean it like that.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/orangeant86
orangeant86
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I can tell you the Japanese didn't sound like Japanese to me (even though I'm not a native speaker). Perhaps that's what it does sound like to people who don't speak the language though? Also the Australian English sounds nothing like how we speak (as a native speaker).

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/nihowdy

Really? I found the Australian to be spot-on. Then again, I am very much a visitor to Australia, I'm sorry, that's how y'all sound :P

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/welindy

YEP. Crazy, but why would someone do that? My sis does that.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/cinthiia_mc
cinthiia_mc
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That just reminded me of this song: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=H-2fw4cgEP4

The portuguese, spanish and english are not gibberish though, and there are some mistakes in the spanish and english parts. The japanese, french, german and arabic gibberish contain stereotypes, so I apologize in advance if someone feels offended.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/soupcatcher

Her French sound just like the recorded language on this site.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/hdcanis
hdcanis
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The stuff said in the beginning before the fake Finnish is real Finnish, btw :) Many versions sound hilariously accurate, Italian of course highly exaggerated but then again, it's Italian (or Pizza). Her Japanese I don't really buy and Spanish was a bit on/off.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MystyrNile
MystyrNile
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While we're talking about gibberish here, i wrote this:

Señora Cadre halemente gueló las fledas porque una pilca ha trodo todos sus pégenes el día anterior.

And the translation: Ms Cadder halically clowed on the flids because a pilca had trumed out all of her parwaughns the previous day.

See how some of the words are the same/similar? Just like actual English and Spanish! :D

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/beechicka

very good! thanks for sharing!

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MelSF

This a hilarious (yet completely useless) skill!

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/wataya
wataya
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It's not useless. American physicist Richard Feynman once fooled a Chinese native speaker into thinking he'd be speaking a different Chinese dialect when in fact he was only producing Chinese-sounding gibberish. I can imagine this to add a lot of fun to your life :)

4 years ago