Duolingo is the most popular way to learn languages in the world. Best of all, it's 100% free!

https://www.duolingo.com/dreiher

EN->DN I am struggling a lot with prepositions.

dreiher
  • 23
  • 21
  • 20
  • 14
  • 14
  • 7
  • 7
  • 6
  • 6
  • 4
  • 2
  • 2
  • 730

Whenever I try to review/practice Dutch(Netherlands) prepositions, I find myself running out of hearts 2-3 times before completing the review correctly (which can be frustrating at times). From what I hear about other courses, prepositions can be hard for any language.

Does anyone have any advice or resources, because the skill doesn't currently have any accompanying tips or explanations?

2
1 year ago
1

6 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/pentaan
pentaan
  • 25
  • 25
  • 23
  • 9
  • 780

Resources:
https://www.duolingo.com/comment/3782321
http://www.heardutchhere.net/BasicDutchPage3.html
Advice: Read, listen, practice, read, listen, practice etc., etc.
In my experience (Dutch native speaker) the prepositions in other languages are very hard to learn.

5
Reply21 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/BasCostBudde
BasCostBudde
  • 14
  • 12
  • 12
  • 11
  • 8
  • 7
  • 6
  • 4
  • 2

Collect them as expressions (vraagt aan hem, zet op de tafel, ...) so you can either "figure out some rhythm" or just learn them inside their usage patterns.

3
Reply1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/stripedkitty
stripedkitty
  • 16
  • 15
  • 13
  • 9
  • 6
  • 144

No advice, just some commiseration- I found that unit erg moeilijk! I repeatedly wrote them out with their meanings to try and keep them straight, but still I miss them too often. And so many ways to say the same thing-- good luck!

1
Reply1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/runhaags
runhaags
  • 24
  • 20
  • 16
  • 15
  • 14
  • 13
  • 13
  • 13
  • 11
  • 10
  • 7
  • 6
  • 5
  • 4
  • 3
  • 2
  • 2
  • 108

The best way to practice prepositions in another language is not to write them down with their "meanings." Prepositions, more than any other part of speech, don't have a 1-to-1 correlation between languages. Even in very similar languages like Dutch and English. In fact, their similarities might make it even harder. For example, depending on context, "aan" can mean "on", "to", "toward", or other things. It's best just to practice repeatedly and try to get as natural a feel as you can for how Dutch prepositions are used. Learning an English word to go with them will make it harder, not easier, to use them correctly.

4
Reply1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Rutger_W
Rutger_W
  • 25
  • 13
  • 11
  • 10
  • 10
  • 133

The prepositions of place, movement and time are probably not the most difficult because they can vary depending on the situation described and will mostly be quite similar to those in other languages.

Prepositions are also used in fixed expressions where the relationship they express isn't as evident and might be quite different from other languages. For example fixed verb-preposition combinations of which overviews can be found here or here

Sometimes prepositions might make more sense if you have a better understanding of the true word for word meaning of a Dutch sentence since the English translation can be quite different. For example Ik schrik van de harde knal. (active verb) vs I am startled by the loud bang. (passive construction).

0
Reply1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MrDubbs
MrDubbs
  • 22
  • 12
  • 4
  • 35

What I've found as I've done more Dutch practice in more contexts, is they sort of manage to just become known. Reading kids books, watching kids' TV, reading Dutch news articles, etc. Just get used to how they're used.

0
Reply1 year ago