https://www.duolingo.com/TarekGhand

People who've completed the Norwegian Course - what has life been like for you afterwards?

Do your Norwegian friends think you speak broken-ish Norwegian or do you sound flawlessly similar to a Norwegian citizen?

What interesting stories can you share?

February 18, 2017

14 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/Luke_5.1991

Since I completed the Norwegian course in 2015, life has never been the same. Some updates:

  • Although Norwegians think my accent is "more natural-sounding" than most Americans who learn Norwegian, I still have an accent, after almost ten years of learning it. This isn't exactly a bad thing, just a reality. If the goal of learning a new language is to be understood, trying to perfect an accent should be kind of an afterthought.
  • I still make spoken mistakes every once in a while. For example, I used to pronounce the word "ord" with an "o" sound when in Norwegian it's actually a deeper "oo" sound. The difference is subtle, which is why it was difficult for me.
  • Living in Norway, I learn new words very often. I knew what "kjøttdeig" was forever (ground meat), but had no idea what "deig" meant until about a week ago (dough).
  • Some accents, especially from western and southern Norway, are still very, very hard to understand. Then again, many Norwegians find these accents troublesome.
February 18, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/cape1232

Oi, the accents. I have a friend in Norway who I can understand well (up to my low ability, anyway), but I can't make out a single word his wife says.

February 21, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/miniummanee

Well, it basically taught me most things I know, as a fresh learner since 2016. I kind of got a little ability of understanding and a skill of forming sentences, and it got me in that phase when everything and everyone influences me, the way my dialect is forming, the way I talk, the way I think... But it's fun, because now I can watch Ylvis without subs! :)

I do have friends who I speak Norwegian with. It goes pretty well, if I don't know a word or get stuck, I just say it in English and it sounds like slang. I have been told that my pronounciation is pretty good.

February 18, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/CinYie

Where do I get Norwegian speaking friends hah

February 18, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/miniummanee

Hellotalk is a great app. Also skype groups.

February 18, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/meowitsmiranda

Hello! I made Norwegian friends by finding Norwegian people on Instagram who also liked Skam! This might work for you since I see you also like Skam:)

February 25, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/Nom-i-yah

I only completed the course a few days ago, but since then two Norwegian friends have expressed to me: "jeg er imponert" which felt really good :) I have a long way to go before fluency, however now the fun has begun. It's officially more fun than work.

February 20, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/Nom-i-yah

(It was also fun before completion because the Norwegian course creators are clever and awesome.)

February 20, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/Deliciae
Mod
  • 184

Takk! Keep making us proud! :)

February 20, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/Nom-i-yah

I lige måte :)

February 20, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/cape1232

I don't know anyone around me who speaks Norwegian, so I don't get many chances to speak. I'm working on that. (@miniummanee suggested HelloTalk, which I am going to try.) But I can read far more Aftenposten online than I could before.

I have to say that I feel strong in comprehension, but very weak in speaking/writing. The Duolingo structure fosters comprehension much more than production, at least on mobile devices, which is what I primarily use to study.

So, I think I'm going to go back through the whole tree on my desktop so that I can do the speaking and timed tests. I think those will help my development a lot. Just a shame I can't do that on the go.

February 21, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/Deliciae
Mod
  • 184

The website version is much better than app version, but beware that it still favours Norwegian-to-English exercises. One thing I'd recommend is to write a paragraph or two in Norwegian for every skill you redo on Duo, and try to implement as much of its vocabulary as possible. It doesn't have to be long, or perfect, but it gets your brain working in the right direction, so to speak.

I'd also recommend saying -every- sentence out loud, that way every exercise is a speaking exercise. :)

February 21, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/cape1232

Good ideas. I will try doing that. I may not have time for the written exercises, but speaking everything out loud sounds like a great idea.

February 23, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/cape1232

BTW, I went to the Språkkurs section of www.folkeuniversitetet.no/Spraakkurs and a few links in found that they have a placement test. I took it and scored A2 on vocab and B1 on reading and listening! (I'm fluent in German, so that helps me with many Norwegian words I may never have learned before.)

It's a fun test, as it adapts to your skill level. So aside from getting a score, it was fun just to have some Norwegian thrown at me that was right at my level.

February 23, 2017
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