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  5. "Dada na Rehema ni wapishi Wa…

"Dada na Rehema ni wapishi Watanzania."

Translation:Sister and Rehema are Tanzanian cooks.

February 20, 2017

10 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/TseDanylo

I found a weird way to remember "mpishi". In Ukrainian "pishu" means "I write". What do people write? Books! What books does my mam like? Cookbooks! Who makes cookbooks? Cooks!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Dalaryn

I remember this because you cook fish!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ChristianofPeace

Lord, I'll probably remember it just because of that... very long way to remember it. lol


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DiegoJaviUnlam

Wapishi (class II) is the plural for mpishi (class I).

Etymology (mpishi)

From the verb -pika ‎(“cook”).

Noun

mpishi (m-wa class, plural wapishi)

1) cook (a person who prepares food for a living)

M-wa class

This class is also known as Class I (in the singular) and Class II (in the plural). It is used to refer to people almost solely; the two notable exceptions are mnyama ‎(“animal”) and mdudu ‎(“insect”), which both serve to categorise animate objects. These prefixes may be added to adjective, noun, or verb stems to express the idea that a person has that characteristic, like Kenya ‎(“Kenya”) → Mkenya ‎(“Kenyan”), or -gonjwa ‎(“sick”) → mgonjwa ‎(“sick person”).

From Wiktionary:

https://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/mpishi

https://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/wapishi

https://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/Appendix:Swahili_noun_classes#M-wa_class


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/NattKullav1

"Sister and Rehema" sounds strange.
Does "Sister" here mean Rehema's sister or speaker's sister or listener's sister?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/bryson145

Sister could mean any young woman. Generally, a 'dada' could refer to your sister, her sister, or another young woman. It doesn't necessarily mean child. For that you would use "mtoto".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/drbazzi

Are country adjectives like "Watanzania" capitalized or not? It seems to vary throughout the course.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Cynthiadeb2

I think that is a bug. all nationalities are ALWAYS with a capitel


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/TemwekaC

I thought it would be Rehema's sister. In my native language (Chichewa/Chinyanja) "asisi a Rehema..." or "sister wa Rehema..." meaning Rehema's sister, and these languages are quite similar, so i just thought...

So if its the two of them, surely you'd start with the named subject like "Rehema na dada lake..."


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Garry917152

"Dada" sounds more like "Nada".

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