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  5. "Anafuta meza."

"Anafuta meza."

Translation:He wipes the table.

February 21, 2017

17 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Aria487

According to Moin dictionary, the Farsi word میز /miz/ table is from Mongolian language.
According to Collinsdictionary.com, the word also exists in Portuguese and in Spanish.
Wordsense.eu notes it comes from Latin "mēnsa" table.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DiegoJaviUnlam

It is really interesting! I really do not know about the origin, but perhaps the borrowing is more from Portuguese. Even in Indonesian, it exists the word "meja", that is because the Portuguese contact with the islanders (also the first Indonesian linguists liked to borrow some words directly from Latin before the independance, resulting a Malay language with a rich addition of Latin, Dutch, Sanskrit, Old Javanese, Arabic, and some words from Portuguese.)

Noun

meza (n class, plural meza)

1) table (item of furniture)

Verb

meza

1) swallow (to cause to pass from the mouth into the stomach)

(Also the word "limau" is a Portuguese borrowing, possibly from Classical Persian)

Etymology (Swahili: limau)

Borrowing from Portuguese limão.

Noun

limau (ma class, plural malimau)

1) lemon (citrus fruit)

Synonyms

ndimu

Etymology (Persian: لیمو)

Compare Sanskrit निम्बू ‎(nimbū, “lime”) and Baluchi لیمبو ‎(limbo).

Pronunciation

(Classical Persian) IPA: /liːˈmoː/

(Iranian Persian) IPA: /liːˈmuː/

(Tajik) IPA: /liːˈmɵː/

Noun

لیمو • (limu) (plural لیموها ‎(limu-hâ))

1) lemon

2) lime

From Wiktionary:

https://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/meza

https://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/limau

https://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/lim%C3%A3o#Portuguese

https://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/%D9%84%DB%8C%D9%85%D9%88#Persian


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/KareemRaad

In Arabic cultures there is a style of eating which is called "meza", which is when many small dishes are shared in the middle of the table -- I was told growing up that the word "meza" referred not only to the style of eating, but also originally meant table, so it is possible that the origin is Arabic, but I am no linguist. Just studying this course I feel like many Swahili words derive from "old-Arabic" (just like there is "old-English") that isn't commonly used anymore.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/postaestetix

In Indonesian it is "meja" (z goes to j quite often there).


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Mr.Quizzical

Table in both Portuguese and Spanish is "mesa". Swahili uses a "z" instead.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Aria487

That much is mentioned in Collins reference, and doesn't change the fact that it's still the same word :-)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/pablopublico

The letter s between vowels sounds /z/ in Portuguese.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/TseDanylo

Thank you for your comments on the discussions. They are very interesting :)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/manyofa

I speak tshivenda from south africa, there are many words that are the same with Swahili, not only tshivenda but all other bantu languages as we have 9 indigenous languages.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/cwaospi

I want to learn Tshivenda and Nguni languages. You should make a course on your language!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/VincentOostelbos

Just a silly mnemonyc I have for kufuta... imagine someone wiping something with their foot!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ElliottDL

"He is wiping the table" is marked wrong??


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/juryrigging

If you think your translation is correct and is marked wrong, use the report feature.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Vanessa119505

Wrong!! " kufuta" is to erase. In school my Kiswahili teacher is like " futa ubao" ( rub the blackboard ) * kupanguza * is to wipe. Not kufuta.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Vanessa119505

Which is why * kifutio * is a rubber/eraser.

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