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https://www.duolingo.com/Samsta

How to say "beans" in Spanish

Samsta
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ProfesorAntonio (native Spanish speaker) posted a discussion in the Spanish General forum asking natives of Spanish which is the most common word for "bean" in their area. Here's the link: frijol VS poroto VS judía.

8
4 years ago

16 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/CattleRustler

Frijoles! And lets not forget habichuelas!

5
Reply4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Talca
Talca
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That's what they are called in Puerto Rico, correcto?

1
Reply4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/espy84

Habichuelas is the Dominican way of saying it too. Can't forget about habichuelas!

2
Reply14 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SaraQuinn23

!Sí! Los Dominicanos se usan la palabra "habichuelas."

0
Reply1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/PuntoH
PuntoH
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You'll hear "porotos" if you come to Chile.

3
Reply4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/YuMoises
YuMoises
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"Frijoles" (Norte y centroamérica) y "habicuelas" (Caribe hispanoparlante) son las más comunes. Las otras formas son más regionales, por ejemplo: "caraotas" que es la forma en que les llaman en Venezuela. Bueno y también está "poroto" (Suramérica).

2
Reply4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Talca
Talca
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Do lima beans have an association with Lima, Peru?

1
Reply4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MJBS
MJBS
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It appears so - see this extract from Wikipedia:

"...The Moche Culture (0-800 CE) cultivated lima beans heavily and often depicted them in their art.[3] During the Spanish Viceroyalty of Peru, lima beans were exported to the rest of the Americas and Europe, and since the boxes of such goods had their place of origin labeled "Lima – Peru", the beans got named as such..."

1
Reply4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/sebasm90
sebasm90
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I've got a venezuelan friend who calls them "caraotas" I just call them "fríjoles" or "frijoles", the accepted one is usually unaccented one, with the stress as "fri-JO-les". I've heard poroto and judía as well around here (colombian atlantic coast) but they're kind of weird.

Habichuela is something a bit different

0
Reply4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ElOtroMiqui
ElOtroMiqui
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I'm from Venezuela, and we (at least Zulian people) call them granos. Caraotas are the black ones, and frijoles are the white ones. We don't call them habichuelas or jorotos or judías.

1
Reply4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/sebasm90
sebasm90
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Yo soy colombiano, acá las habichuelas son otra cosa :P Me refiero a como dicen por acá en el atlántico en Colombia.

1
Reply4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Pablitogs

i'm from argentina, here and in south america in general, we say poroto, in mexico and near they say frijol or abichuela and in spain i think they say frijol too

0
Reply4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Samsta
Samsta
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It seems that the most common word in Spain is "judía".

0
Reply4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Pablitogs

another thing that is important here is that maybe these words are different, for example here we say poroto to one specific fruit, and legumbre/legumbres in general, maybe judia, abichuela or frijol are another specific legumbres

0
Reply4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/rvf35

I hear "alubia" more often than "judia," but maybe that's just the region where I lived in Spain (Salamanca).

0
Reply1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AlejoPF
AlejoPF
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In Colombia we say Fríjoles (note that the accent (´) is on "i", stress in FRÍ-jo-les)

It's different from frijoles (whitout accent) that Mexicans use.

0
Reply4 years ago