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https://www.duolingo.com/Onagraceae

Babies learn sounds prepartum

Onagraceae
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https://www.nytimes.com/2017/02/21/well/family/language-lessons-start-in-the-womb.html?smid=tw-share

¨... as very young infants, babies are able to distinguish all the different sounds used in all the world’s languages. But during the second half of their first year, babies get better at distinguishing the sounds that are used in their own languages, and lose the ability to distinguish the sounds they aren’t hearing. Thus, a baby growing up hearing Japanese will lose the ability to distinguish between “la” and “ra,” while a baby growing up hearing Korean will retain the ability to distinguish three different ways of pronouncing a sound like “tal” that has only one way of being pronounced in Dutch.¨

Thought this was interesting and wanted to share! I wish I could peak inside the mind of a newborn.

1 year ago

7 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/CharmingTiger
CharmingTiger
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Wow! I agree with you. I've always wondered about the different changes that take place in a person's mind at various points in their life, and if it would be possible to revert back to certain previous aspects of our brains that best allowed for us to soak up knowledge like a sponge as a very young child.

Thank you for researching this, and sharing it with us! ^_^

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/pdbpoet

You also find the sounds /baba/,/dada/and /mama/ being used for baby, mummy and daddy in may languages, though /baba/ could, for instance, refer to any one of the three, depending on the language. These being the early sounds a baby makes. A good book on infant psychology will give you insights into an infant's thought processes.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Olivia_Beringer

Very interesting

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Camilla-danesa
Camilla-danesa
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fascinating!

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Deyan161
Deyan161
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I heard something similar about a study of newborns through their first year on babies borne to Chinese and English-speaking families in California - at first they reacted to all sounds but at about six months they paid more attention to their mother's tongue (literally) sounds and started to ignore the 'foreign' ones. Sorry I can't give you the reference - it might have been on the UCLA website but I can't actually remember.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Onagraceae
Onagraceae
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Interesting, I wonder if this article was based off of that research

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Deyan161
Deyan161
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It's very probable. I think one of the conclusions was that babies learn very quickly to discriminate the sounds that are important. It seems to me that people exposed as infants to more than one language should therefore have an advantage over the rest of us!

1 year ago