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"Estoy aquí para servir."

Translation:I am here to serve.

5 years ago

54 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/sneuberg

Yes to serve the strawberry

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Baconquistador

LOL :D

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/That_guy667

Valar dohaeris.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/OlegSkalsky
OlegSkalsky
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Why "I'm here for serving" is incorrect?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/julianadkins93

Servir is an infinitive, so wouldn't you have to write out "to serve"?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Talca
Talca
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In my opinion, I think Duo should accept that. Of course, as the sentence stands it sounds stilted.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Talca
Talca
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Great example of using para.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ignatznkrazy
ignatznkrazy
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Can't servir also mean to function as in Este teléfono no sirve?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/GamerInfinity

¿Ella está aquí servir a mi esposa? No sé lo que quieres decir, pero creo que querías decir -> Ella está aquí para servir a mi esposa. (^_^)/

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/TracyS221
TracyS221
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Can someone please explain why the para is here? I'm still unsure.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/sandra027
sandra027
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"to" is literally "para"... I’m not sure what is your doubt, sorry

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/TracyS221
TracyS221
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My doubt is because server is the infinitive & in English it would be "to serve" so I get confused to when another preposition is needed.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/sandra027
sandra027
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I’m sorry Tracy... but I don't know how to help you...

I'm here TO .... (do something) = Estoy aquí PARA .... (hacer lo que sea)

In this particular case: it was "to serve" = "servir"

other examples:
I'm here to take care=Estoy aquí para cuidar
I'm here to clean=Estoy aquí para limpiar
you are here to work=usted está aquí para trabajar
we are here to eat=estamos aquí para comer
they are here to play football=Ellos están aquí para jugar al fútbol

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/TracyS221
TracyS221
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I guess I'm struggling to explain! - When I first saw this example (in English) I thought "is that just 'Estoy aquí servir' or do I need another preposition?"

To me "Estoy aquí para server" would translate literally as I am here FOR TO serve, or I am here in order TO TO serve. (Note the repeated preposition) as para = FOR or In order TO, and servir = TO serve! So if you add them together you get a double preposition. To me, the Spanish feels like it's got a double (implied) preposition.

Sometimes when we use the infinitive in Spanish we don't add an extra preposition to translate the TO that then appears in English. eg I would like to have = me gustaria tener. (I think) And I just get confused over when we do and when we don't.

This may be still as clear as mud. Don't worry if it is, I'm sure I'll work it out eventually! Thanks for your efforts so far. :-)

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/bdbarber
bdbarber
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I agree with you that the spanish sentence seems to have the double "to"--"to to serve." But I guess we just have to accept that this is just the way it is said in Soanish.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MexicoMadness
MexicoMadness
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Tracy, I understand your question and would also like to know the answer.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/EmilyS.901342

Thought of one more related example:

Tienes que regresar = You have to return

Here you use "que" before the infinitive because that's what tienes requires.

In all three cases, the preposition para, que, or no preposition, is determined by the other words in the sentence - not the infinitive verb.

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Majklo_Blic
Majklo_Blic
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In sentences like this, "para" translates as "in order to".

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/alex_wei
alex_wei
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exactly, think of the english sentence as "I'm here in order to serve."

5 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/EmilyS.901342

Have you ever heard a non native English speaker say something like, "for to do" instead of "to do?" That's basically what's happening here. "I'm here for to serve."

In Spanish the infinitive is simply the unconjugated verb. We commonly translate unconjugated verbs into English with "to" but that is not a literal word for word equivalent. In fact, you're likely familiar two other forms of the English infinitive that doesn't use "to" either, but are still the infinitive:

empezo a correr = started to run = started running

Empezo must always be followed by "a" to indicate what was started, so the infinitive here is preceded by a, but the a belongs to empezo, not correr. Correr, like "running" in the second English translation, is an infinitive. (Don't get this confused with the English gerund noun "running" as in, "His running has improved.")

puedo comprar = I can buy

Puedo does not require a preposition, so the infinitive stands alone here. Notice also that in the English infinitive of this phase there is no "to" either.

English is the language that's confusing here moreso than Spanish with our three different forms of the infinitive :D

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Gaius_Plinius

Running is a present participle not an infinitive.

You are using Spanish grammar to explain the English, but the two function completely independently of each other. That is why a Spanish infinite may be translated as a present participle in English.

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SuperSammyC

the translation when you click on servir here is to work or to function

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jindr004
jindr004
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Servir is not a synonym of utilizar, trabajar, andar, funcionar, or any other word in a way that would make sense here. The problem is one of double translation.

When something is useful or possibly can be of use, one might say "That will serve", to mean that you can use it, it will work using that, or it will function. The same is true in Spanish.

For example: La estrategia de miedo no va a servir, which can be translated correctly as "The strategy of fear will not work" and "The strategy of fear will not serve".

To include that meaning and usage (in both Spanish and English), the drop-down suggestions include those possibilities.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/rocko2012
rocko2012
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"work" sounds like it would be ok here.

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/stokeysam
stokeysam
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What are you doing on the base line Mr Federer?............

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/spikypsyche
spikypsyche
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... ¿para servir al hombre?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/markgjensen

does anyone else hear este instead of estoy?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Dare3966
Dare3966
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In slow audio it always sounds like este

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/EmilyS.901342

I heard "está ya aquí" instead of "estoy aquí" at first.

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/papavinnie
papavinnie
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The pronunciation of the slower speech seems different than the regular speed and therefore misleading

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/troelsvk
troelsvk
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For some reason my mind read this in the voice of Dobby from Harry Potter

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/KeiraPolan

When do you use por vs para before an infinitive? I would have used por because the reason I am here is to serve.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/scottcabal

As far as i know its always para in this sort of usage. Think of para + infinitive as the bad translation that non native speakers sometimes use "for to..." so for this example "i here for to serve".

This YouTube video helped me a lot when i first started learning. Its 45 minutes long but goes into the por vs para discussion in a lot of detail to help you understand https://youtu.be/1UsHmPkUx_o

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Muyil
Muyil
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Regular voice says ' Estoy aqui para servir'. Slow voice says 'Este aqui para servir'. Reporting. Happens now and then

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/vlid0o

Khas I serve !

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MD737

As the Vulcans say

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AnnRon

Irritating, not to mention misleading.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/BezJones
BezJones
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Any reason why "I'm here for service" is wrong?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Majklo_Blic
Majklo_Blic
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In English, "for service" almost always means that one is being served, not performing the service. For example, "My car was in for service" means that my car was being repaired, not that it was being driven around like a taxi.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/seaangler
seaangler
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when my car goes in for a service its being checked out in the hope that nothing goes wrong, (preventive maintenance) if there are things need doing, then its being repaired

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Majklo_Blic
Majklo_Blic
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True enough, but my point still stands. Your car is having a service performed upon it, not performing one for someone else.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/NoelEtrof
NoelEtrof
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Not "I'm here to be useful"?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/scottcabal

Nope. That would be "para ser útil" i believe

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Deen14

hmmn... reminds me of politicians

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ChristianE593943

Why do you use "para" instead of "a"?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MichaelDan234449

¡Es un libro de cocina!

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/RobertLari1

Too difficult to click buttons!

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/calloc1222

My life for Ner'zhul

5 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/lgriffith89

debe jesús

1 week ago

https://www.duolingo.com/-LiamAnderson-
-LiamAnderson-
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I think Duolingo is secretly a dark company trying to lure us in to serving strawberries... (jokes)

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/sjmkeogh

Once again, the word on the drop down hint is NOT the same as the answer! servir- you gave work as a hint, but will not accept it as an answer. The correct answer was not even listed.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/TilEulenspiegel

This is what happens when someone thinks a computer can teach a language without human intervention. Crowdsourcing has its limitations; it's no wonder so few people make it to this level of DL.

4 years ago