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  5. "Mchana mwema Esther"

"Mchana mwema Esther"

Translation:Have a good afternoon Esther

February 24, 2017

13 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/lukeapprend

When do we use "mwena" vs. "njena" (I think that's what it is...)?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Hrafnunga

It depends on what noun class the modified noun falls under. Afternoon (mchana) is under the m-mi class, while morning (asubuhi) is under the n-class. Cf https://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/Appendix:Swahili_noun_classes and https://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/ema#Inflection


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AndreasII

Mchana is in the m-mi class. M-wa is reserved for living beings.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Hrafnunga

Thanks, corrected.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JFK699634

I was told here, in Kenya, to say usiku mwema and not usiku njema. Which seems to contradict your rule (mwema for m-mi class).


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/CatMcCat

If you listen to the audio for the entire sentence, it's right. However, if you hover over the first word, mchana, the audio is wrong (sounds like miaosita). (I'm reporting this as an audio problem.)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Immortan_Jacob

Is this a greeting, or is it a farewell?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RaizinM

Western first names are fairly common in many parts of Africa. Especially Biblical names like Esther.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Ernst557459

Western first names are fairly common in many parts of Africa. Especially Biblical names like Esther.

Woow, neocolonialistc thinking! So, names originating from the Middle East more than 2000 years ago are now western names? And African languages adopted them from European languages?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/chaered

So would the name be pronounced as in English, or with "ther" like the first part of "therapy"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Jae_Grey

Probably not. The name will most likely take on some prononciation changes from the first language(s) of the people. How it sounds in East Africa, I'm not sure. I've heard Es-tah and Es-teh from West Africans. But I'm no expert!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Ninnoc12

what is the difference between -ema and -zuri?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/machieng

they're synonymous, when you're talking about the state of something/someone (typically if you mean 'pleasant')

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