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https://www.duolingo.com/coco226598

Why learn Norwegian? Most Norwegian speak English. Honest question.

coco226598
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Besides permanently moving to Norway I can see no reason. Unless of course you just want to out of passion for the culture.

1 year ago

20 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/Deliciae
Deliciae
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If you're not interested in Norway, its culture, its language, exercising your brain or going reference hunting there is indeed little point in taking the Norwegian course.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/nwgat2

well if you ever gonna learn danish or swedish, then learning norwegian gets you almost there from the start ;)

8 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Fugl_

det stemmer :)

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Luke_5.1991
Luke_5.1991
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My Norwegian friends are less fun when they speak in English.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Deliciae
Deliciae
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Pfft... I'm always hilarious. ;)

Inadvertently so in some languages, but still.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/TopherKLA
TopherKLA
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Millions of Americans, myself included, have family that came from Norway. I decided to try and learn it because it was my grandmother's native language. Also, although I haven't gotten around to finishing the tree, I speak fluent German which along with having English as a native language makes learning Norwegian easier.

Millione av Amerikansker har familie de har kommet fra Norge. Jeg vil snakker språket av farmor mi. Også, jeg snakker Tysk og hvis du snakker Engelsk og Tysk, Norsk er mer enkel.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Simon104416

Milioner av Amerikanere har familie som kommer fra Norge. Jeg vil snakke farmoren min sitt språk. Jeg snakker også Tysk. Hvis du snakker Engelsk og Tysk er Norsk et enkelt språk

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Iom_Korvo
Iom_Korvo
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I learned Danish before I learned Norwegian, even though I never planned to live in Denmark. It took me 1 month to grasp the basics, and 3 months to begin writing in it. But I struggled to understand it spoken. The biggest thing I gained was a deeper and richer understanding of another worldview, culture, and the ability to read literature and make more intimate friendships with a people than I would have had I spoken English. I remember being upset at first once I realized that everyone spoke almost perfect English but it was very easy to say "Speak only Danish" with me. Once I had learned the language though, even though people spoke English what I had gained from having learned Danish was something I would never trade for the world. I gained a new way of seeing and thinking about the world, and when I moved on to study Russian, my experience in Danish and easy introduction to some concepts made that introduction to Russian easier. But then one day something magical happened. You see I never could understand Danish spoken. I could read it, I could write it, but I couldn't speak or understand it. I thought it was me. I tried to get into Swedish later but, eventually after I lost touch with my Danish friends I ended up walking away from it. One day while watching TV someone began speaking in what I thought was Danish -- I thought it was Danish because it was so clear, I could understand it so clearly. I knew what he was talking about, what he was saying.

I immediately went to research the character and the language only to discover the language was Norwegian. How was that possible? This best sums it up: https://www.babbel.com/en/magazine/the-scandinavian-languages-three-for-the-price-of-one

In recent days I've been trying to justify why I should learn the languages of countries that not many people speak. Why I should just focus on the larger languages. I list all the reasons why it's a waste of my time to learn a language of a country that I will probably never visit. The answer is because in my dance with different languages I've always been given a new and different perspective of how those people view the world as a culture. It gives me insight into other people, cultures, worlds, and even if I don't end up using it, I can understand my fellow brothers and sisters on the other side of the world. You see studies consistently show that our languages shape our reality, including the way we perceive colours and their shades. The beliefs and cultures of people are reflected in the words they use to describe life. We can learn a lot from other people by learning to speak the languages they do, and that understanding serves as a bridge.

So for me I've decided to learn Norwegian again because it gives me the opportunity to kill two birds with one stone, and offers me the ability to speak and talk and make connections with people from their perspectives. That is solidarity to me.

If a person does not even have the curiosity to explore another persons worldview, or the passion to begin that dialogue, or an interest in that culture, then it is as Deliciae has said -- no point in it. But if you're open to the idea of opening your mind to another way of seeing, and gaining insights then there is a point in Norwegian or any language you should choose thereafter.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Coreopsis2943

The same question can be asked of Swedish, which I have been diligently working on for several years, and yes, lots and lots of people speak English, but only when they're talking to foreigners. Among themselves, they always speak Swedish, which will leave you completely out of the picture.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/meowitsmiranda

I am from America and I am currently getting my bachelors degree in English Language and Literature. I am planning on applying to University of Oslo to get my masters in English Language (with an emphasis on bilingual countries) and I think it would be beneficial to learn the language if I am going to be studying there. Also I want to be an English teacher in other countries so I am currently learning Spanish and German in school as well but I love Norwegian culture so I think it would be great to live and teach there if possible, so that is why I am learning Norwegian:)

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Nod84
Nod84
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It strikes to me that Norwegian is probably the easiest among all Scandinavian/Nordic languages that's why I have devoted and poured more time into it. If I were to start from Icelandic or Danish, that would make a much tougher beginning and introduction into North-Germanic languages. Also, about half of the Norwegian vocabulary is very familiar, if one already knows German and English. The hardest problem in Norwegian is having to deal with numerous accents and local dialects. But as long as one mainly learns in order to just use the bokmal written form (let's say in order to read a few NRK articles or to read lyrics of a few songs), then the dialects are not much of a problem. I'm never gonna speak like a native anyway. So, I care more about ideas, rather than accents. Also, like many people wrote, most Scandinavians speak English already. But I believe that they average somewhere around A2/B1/B2, so if you wanna make deeper conversations with them, then I think it's an advantage to reach A1/A2 in some Nordic language, because you can then adjust your English so that they can understand it better. When I write in English to Norwegians or to Swedes, I usually use on purpose many words which I already know that they are almost the SAME in both Norwegian and English (e.g. hi, can, best, many, come, mine, see, from, them, all, give, thing, like, help, little, begin, therefore, again, well, self, for, here, often, shall (instead of will) etc. ) so my script makes more sense to them. Therefore, I can make a different and adaptable selection of English words, based on circumstance. Such a thing can seem more like "Norglish" (=a hybrid English with a Norwegian twist). I engage and use similar chameleon techniques to adjust my English when I'm writing to Spanish or to Italian folks. However, it's a different 'common word' overlapping inventory there between English and Latin-based languages. But between English and North-Germanic languages, I have made my own common word inventory.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/amaratea
amaratea
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Even when you move to the country temporarily (for studies or a work project), you will benefit from learning the local language. Not only Norwegian. Unless always feeling as an outsider and being unable to track what is happening around you is in your love-to list.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ConnorMaichle
ConnorMaichle
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Others have made great points here. Personally, I started studying because I heard it was easy, but I continued because it really clicked with me. I just felt a connection with it and it almost felt like it came naturally. So now I'm continuing to learn it.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Rave73643

Same with me

5 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/nherm

I find that the farther north one goes in Norway, the less English is spoken. They can read it quite well but do not use English in everyday life, so communicating becomes kind of rudimentary. If you only are concerned with communicating in the larger areas, businesses and shops, English is fine. If you are out among the people in their real life or in more remote areas, then Norwegian is a real plus.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Jcoire

It was my mother's first language and she spoke it in the home. I'd like to be able to speak the mother tongue and I'd like to stay someday with my cousins in Norway.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Veli-Pekka10

I love Norway and travel there quite frequently. I would like to be able to handle at least basic transactions in a shop, restaurant, hotel, etc. in Norwegian. And farther you go from big cities, the less you can take for granted that people speak English. Also signs such as roadsigns are not always translated for us foreign people.

It is not Norway specific, but in many countries the local people appreciate if you make at least a small effort in their language. And in Norway it's better than speaking Swedish.

And moving to Norway at some point in the future is not out of the question. :)

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/CharlesLyn3
CharlesLyn3
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I just like Norwegian, and I love nordic languages.

1 year ago