"Mambo"

Translation:Hello

February 27, 2017

38 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Sarahngola1

What about jambo? How is that different from mambo?

March 18, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/kelly695126

In the area of Tanzania where I live, mambo is a very informal greeting used by younger people or with people you know well. Jambo is more formal, can be used by everyone and is the more acceptable greeting. You would never say mambo to someone older than you or someone you do not know.

March 20, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/baradhili

I would have thought a language course would have used Hujambo

December 11, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/baradhili

I also got that feeling that there were quite a lot of slang words in this course? I really would never use mambo except to my drinking buddies

December 11, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
  • 2006

https://www.duolingo.com/skill/sw/Greetings-1

Some Tanzanians use the greeting Jambo when greeting foreigners. In most cases Jambo is considered to be a touristic greeting. Generally foreigners are associated with tourists and for that matter this greeting is commonly used with foreigners.

March 19, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Saina371079

hello

October 8, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DanaeChurc

When I lived in Kenya, "mambo" was best described to me as translating to: "What's up?" This brings the understanding that it's an informal greeting generally used amongst peers or the younger generations. The response "poa" meaning "cool" would then be similar to the English response of "not much".

April 24, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/manyofa

So the reply is also mambo?

March 12, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/_317537_

The usual reply is "poa," which means "cool."

March 13, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
  • 2006

As in the temperature/weather?

March 13, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/HannahAlexiaGee

Cool as in 'good' or 'swell' or 'nice' like in English we would say "that's cool" as a form of positive expression; not cool as in temperature

April 2, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
  • 2006

Asante!

April 6, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Patricia308653

Im used to Jambo

March 20, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Gazelle1596

That's the tourist version (see above). :)

May 18, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/manievdh

I am sure "How are things?" should also be considered a correct English translation?

April 19, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Konrad-Michal

Why not affairs?

March 13, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/HannahAlexiaGee

I tend to agree, when I lived in Tanzania I was taught the transliteration was 'business'

April 2, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/baradhili

being picky.. you mean translation.. transliteration is using one script to make the sounds of another language.. eg romanji, hanupinyin, etc

December 11, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Konrad-Michal

Thanks for your confirmation!

April 6, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Wowza42

Would "mambo" be comparable to the colloquial English "'sup"?

November 23, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/baradhili

sort of.. and go over just as well :)

December 11, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Monicel2

Shouldn't "hi" be allowed as a correct answer as well?

February 27, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
  • 2006

That depends on the register "mambo" is meant to be. "Hello" is a more formal register than "hi", so it might not be the most appropriate translation.

March 8, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SilasWolfe

I'll totally use this all the time

June 13, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/BaThel01

Can "mambo" also mean problems?

April 5, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/BaThel01

as in isssues??

April 5, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/bagaya4

I believe so

June 22, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DmitryReve

I've heard somewhere "mambo jambo" :)

May 2, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SilasWolfe

ha! ha! ha! XD

June 13, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/bagaya4

Mambo can be used for " any issues?" and the reply should be "Hakuna Mambo" which is "no issues"

June 22, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
  • 2006

So that would mean "hakuna" is a negation like "no" or "none" if The Lion King's translation of "hakuna matata" is the least bit accurate.

August 21, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ElDoctr

That's right. "Hakuna" literally means "there isn't (any)"

August 23, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/baradhili

I would use sijambo though... but one always follows it by lakini... my cow died, my grandmother has had kittens...etc :)

December 11, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/baradhili

Mambo is either official business, or slang... people would look at you a bit strange I think... normally you would use hujambo, with the reply sijambo (no matters)

December 11, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/LilaMaigna

Can we say "Habari" for Hello ?

January 18, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Gazelle1596

Yes, but usually (as is taught) it doesn't stand alone: "Habari za nyumbani?" f.e.

May 18, 2018

[deactivated user]

    I have never heard this expression before. I learned some traditional KiSwahili conversation before going to Tanzania 12 years ago and the local people told me I had extremely good grammar and pronunciation. I was trying this as a refresher, but I feel like this Swahili is Kenyan or slang and not as proper. Not sure I want to continue unless these words are common and acceptable in Tanzania.

    June 29, 2018

    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Gazelle1596

    It's youth language - I'd use it with some friends as a kid in TZ (which also is 12 or more years ago). Sure, slang and Kenyan expressions are included, but this is a good start - it still is in beta, so there are mistakes. Also keep in mind that language changes and twelve years are quite long. Kind regards,

    July 2, 2018
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