1. Forum
  2. >
  3. Topic: Swahili
  4. >
  5. "Kisu na kijiko"

"Kisu na kijiko"

Translation:Knife and spoon

February 28, 2017

5 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DiegoJaviUnlam

Etymology (kijiko)

Borrowing from Turkish kaşık.

Noun

kijiko (ki-vi class, plural vijiko)

1) spoon

Usage notes

This is used to mean a Western-style metal spoon. Mwiko is used for the large wooden spoon that Africans traditionally use.

(Perhaps, this is the only word from Turkic origin)

From Wiktionary: https://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/kijiko

February 28, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AGreatUserName

That's completely fanciful. Kijiko is related to mwiko (big spoon) and jiko (stove, kitchen).

Wold lists it as "no evidence for borrowing". http://wold.clld.org/vocabulary/1

June 17, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/the3lusive

Kijiko is for eating and mwiko is for cooking

April 13, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DiegoJaviUnlam

Interesting! Can we say this is the same as Spanish "cuchara de madera" or perhaps "cucharón"? (Both are for cooking but still I do not know the correct English for them.)

I really appreciate your help. Asante sana! :)

April 13, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/the3lusive

Both the cuchara de madera and cucharón would be called a mwiko in Swahili. The most appropriate translation in English would be a spatula for a cuchara de madera and the cucharón would be a ladle. If the cucharón is used for stirring juice or taking sugar to put into the juice it's a kijiko but if it's used to stir curry in a pot it becomes a mwiko. Unless you want to be seen as a glutton in front of a mswahili, you would eat your plate of rice with a kijiko and not with a mwiko.

April 14, 2017
Learn Swahili in just 5 minutes a day. For free.