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"Mlango wangu"

Translation:My door

February 28, 2017

5 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/s.rombaut

I don't get it, how can you decide whether a word belongs to the m/wa class or the m/mi class without knowing its plural?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DiegoJaviUnlam

I think they are divided by their nature (while m/wa nouns are describing human beings, and some exceptions like "wanyama" = animals, and "wadudu" = insects, the class m/mi describes other kind of animals and plants as inanimates.)

M-wa class

This class is also known as Class I (in the singular) and Class II (in the plural). It is used to refer to people almost solely; the two notable exceptions are mnyama ‎(“animal”) and mdudu ‎(“insect”), which both serve to categorise animate objects. These prefixes may be added to adjective, noun, or verb stems to express the idea that a person has that characteristic, like Kenya ‎(“Kenya”) → Mkenya ‎(“Kenyan”), or -gonjwa ‎(“sick”) → mgonjwa ‎(“sick person”).

Adjectives agree with the same prefixes as the noun, but verbs agree with the prefix a- in the singular and wa- in the plural.

Prefix: m-, mw-, mu-

mtu — person.

mtoto — child.

Plural prefix: wa-, w-

watu — people.

watoto — children.

M-mi class

This class is also known as Class III (in the singular) and Class IV (in the plural). It is used to refer to inanimates almost solely, but Swahili considers plants and groupings of animals or people to be inanimate. Natural phenomena and active body parts also belong in this category, as well as anything inanimate that has a connection to one of the concepts listed above, like an object made from a plant. These prefixes may be added to noun stems to express the name of a plant that bears a certain fruit, like tende ‎(“date”) → mtende ‎(“date palm”).

Adjectives agree with the same prefixes as the noun, but verbs agree with the prefix u- in the singular and i- in the plural.

Prefix: m-, mw-, mu-

mti — tree.

mwaka — year.

muhogo — cassava.

Plural prefix: mi-, my-

miti — trees.

miaka — years.

mihogo — cassavas.

From Wiktionary: https://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/Appendix:Swahili_noun_classes#M-mi_class


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Carolyn217

Very helpful!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MugodaSimo

DiegoJaviUnlam, thanks 4 de detailed info, but Please, I would like to know How, and where to use Wangu and Yangu...thnks


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Phmeza

It seems in the "M-Mi class" singular takes "wa" while plural takes "ya". E.g. mti (tree)= wangu Miti (trees)= yangu

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