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https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SalihanGRB

How can you deal with so many languages?

Hey Guys!!

Sometimes i come across with people with over 10 languages... Congragulations!! I really wonder how you deal with sooo many words and languages....

Please enlighten me!

March 1, 2017

13 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Viking...

It is quality , not quantity.

March 1, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/TimmohB

Well it doesn't mean they are actively learning all of those languages, but some people do indeed pull that off..


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/seanbrownlee13

drink the juice of a thousand dying pelicans


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Mathso2

That is obviously my exact strategy.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ionasky

Why didn't I think of that?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/chaered

I find that hard to swallow


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/E.T.Gregor

Similarities between the languages, patience, structured learning and a bit of discipline. Also, habit: like f.ex. musical instrument, once you're proficient in one, the second one is easier, the third one is easier still etc. Even if the languages aren't related, you'll find similarities, you understand concepts etc.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ionasky

After a while the process of learning becomes easier and related languages help each other out. Similar grammar rules, similar words etc.

Bits do get mixed up at first but after a while they sort themsleves out...kind of. Honest....lol.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/HooSteveK

Because I think this is meant seriously and not sarcastically, I will wade into the thread with these thoughts.

Some people came here with some background in a learned language (or two or four). So learning a language can be easier if you have other background knowledge to leverage it with. For me, HS/college background in French along with being a native English speaker made learning Spanish easier. Some words are nearly identical in all three languages. Later, progressing in both French and Spanish made Italian easier. Yes, it can be hard to separate them at times, but trying trees translating from one to the other can help a lot with that differentiation (e.g., FR-SP or SP-FR for the native English speaker).

Of course, unrelated languages are more difficult. German? Tougher for me than the first two. Russian? For me, it will take YEARS to get Russian to a level anywhere near the other languages, which is admittedly high beginner/low intermediate. But I try to do a little each day and/or week to improve (including some learning in acquired languages ... currently working on the "learning French from Russian" tree in addition to working to maintain the other languages).


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/CodyORB

Focus on 1 or 2 at a time. When you've finished the tree and have a handle of the language, start a new one. Climb up from there, and remember to practice on your older languages as well.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SalihanGRB

Thank you, nice advice...


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SalihanGRB

Thanks everybody for replies

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