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https://www.duolingo.com/russianlearner00

How do I memorize Russian grammar/vocab?

As an adult learner, this baffles me. I have been learning this language for a little over a month now. There's a ton of grammar rules and vocabulary, obviously, but how would I go about memorizing this by heart? It seems quite overwhelming, wouldn't you say? I can't even imagine holding a conversation with a native speaker and not only memorizing the right words, how to say them, but also the right grammatical use of them.

Also, for the vocab , do you think it would be all right if I skipped certain words ( at least for now )? I don't think that I would be able to learn ALL the vocab there is, that would be truly impossible. For example, would it be acceptable if I skipped over names of people , some names of cities/countries, etc. etc.? Since I don't consider learning them essential... until the need arises.

Tips on memorizing the numerous grammar rules and vocabulary, especially for speaking with a fluent Russian speaker in the future?

1 year ago

12 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/LanguageLover.

Have you tried "TinyCards"? It's helpful for me. ;)

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Simon104416

What's that?

1 year ago

[deactivated user]

    Memrise or Anki are good for vocabulary, and to a certain extent grammar (it helps you acquire patterns, rather than just rules).

    EditDelete1 year ago

    https://www.duolingo.com/xO.Lx
    xO.Lx
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    I use quizlet, it's a phone app. It is very helpful for me :D

    1 year ago

    https://www.duolingo.com/knudvaneeden
    knudvaneeden
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    Q. Is Russian difficult or easy?

    A.

    Russian is indeed a hard language. Exceptions, complicated grammar rules, extra characters in words at places you do not expect them, different word order, closely equal sounding characters so difficult to distinguish them, idioms, irregularities, .... Very difficult.

    1 year ago

    https://www.duolingo.com/knudvaneeden
    knudvaneeden
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    Q. Where can I find the Duolingo tinycards flash cards (e.g. for the official Duolingo Russian course)?

    A.

    http://tinycards.duolingo.com

    ===

    For example:

    1 year ago

    https://www.duolingo.com/Kolyalyskin
    Kolyalyskin
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    I am a native Russian and English speaker, but for me it is sometimes hard to keep up with uncommon Russian vocab so I usually watch Russian movies and tv shows (even though Russian shows are so low budget)

    1 year ago

    https://www.duolingo.com/pippipippip
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    The advice I was given about Russian is to take it slow. The very first stage can confuse and frustrate if it's taken too fast, and you should definitely resist the temptation to try and rush anything. As for the grammar - you have to let it sink in, slow and steady, and every time you come back and practice the same level it gets easier. I never go onto a new level without making sure all the tree so far is gold. I'm coming up to six months of Russian now, and I'm only at the halfway point of Duolingo, which is fine by me because I came in expecting it to take me a year. Don't let it get you down too much though: I'm also told that once you have the basics down it gets easier :-)

    1 year ago

    https://www.duolingo.com/PatrickCurran1

    Grammar is tough, but it's the vocab that's the immigrant-killer, and that's 80 or 90% of what it takes to converse. It's just that English cognates are few and far between. At first it's just pounding them into your head. Then after a while the roots, prefixes become familiar and make it a bit easier to acquire new words. Still, you'll wonder how their poor children must suffer, having to learn 25 times the vocabulary an English speaker knows just to get into secondary school, what with all the inflections, diminutives, etc. ;)

    1 year ago

    https://www.duolingo.com/Kundoo
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    Well, it's not like we actually learn all the inflection of a single word as if they were separate words. I see them as the same word and the endings just come naturally. For me "кошка", "кошке", "кошку", "кошечка", "кошечки" are not different words but merely the variants of one.

    And once you get a grip on the logic of particles, you can guess the meaning of the unfamiliar word if you know the root. So you don't really need to memorise them.

    So the actual vocabulary a Russian child has to learn is not that much bigger then the English speaking child :)

    1 year ago

    https://www.duolingo.com/PatrickCurran1

    Seriously, Russian is a beautiful language. It's a language for poets, or maybe it's simply the natural expression of a poetic people.

    1 year ago