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https://www.duolingo.com/lucguillou

breton language

I'am from brittany ,irish and welsh learners have you heard about this celtic language relative to welsh and cornish . irish is much more difficult for me but I keep on

1 year ago

9 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/EllisVaughan
EllisVaughan
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If anyone's looking for resources for Breton from English or Welsh, I personally use a copy of "Breton Grammar" by Roparz Hemon in it's translated form by Michael Everson as my source of grammar and a copy of "Brezhoneg.... Buan hag aes" by Per Denez (again in a translated form by R.Delaporte) though this is a pretty old book which I got second hand off amazon where there appears to be at least one English copy still in stock. The only Welsh resource I use is a Breton to Welsh dictionary titled "Geiriadur bach Llydaweg-Cymraeg" by Rita Williams though unfortunately this is only one way from Breton to Welsh. Both of the English books have also had sections adapted in order to concentrate more closely on the aspects of Breton which are less familiar to an English speaker than a French speaker (e.g the concept of grammatical genders) though if you speak Cornish or Welsh already you will find sections (especially the ones explaining mutations) to be a tad long winded due to you being familiar with the concepts already.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/lucguillou

i saw recently a book 'method? or study written by mr conroy (an irish name) in english about breton

9 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Richard996961
Richard996961
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Years ago a native Welsh speaker told me that to them (presumably because of all the -zh- sounds in Breizh) Breton sounded "like Welsh spoken through a mouthful of ice cream."

Coincidentally, I have heard the same description of another language: a fluent, but non-native Spanish speaker once told me that Portuguese "sounds like Spanish through a mouthful of ice cream."

All of which naturally leads me to one of my 6-year-old daughter's few phrases of French - qu'est-ce qu'il y a comme glace? :)

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/mizinamo
mizinamo
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My Cornish teacher once told me that having overheard some Breton speakers who had come to the Cornish Language Weekend, he thought it sounded like Cornish with a French accent (presumably due to the nasal vowels).

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/lucguillou

the vowels sound is a real mark for a language, when we go outside brittany , even french native speakers, we are identified as breton people with our é instead ai milk: lait , becomes lé and the short o. when i talk with welsh people they think I have a good accent, 2 reasons in my mind the vowels and the different sound from usual beginers english speakers.Did the bretons coming to the cornish week end have a good breton accent ? who knows the real sound of cornish ?No word for" bonjour " in breton in my town people still say in french a kind of how are you , as we do in breton.the accent and the expressions stay

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Arthfoel

The biggest surprise for me is the ch sound in Breton and how it differs from Welsh. The spelling of words can actually hide similarities as well - I was surprised to hear Harz in Breton sounding vaguely recogniseable as aros in Welsh, yet the spelling would never suggest any similarity at all.

Do you speak Breton and if so which dialect?. I am keen to learn more, but the learning materials from English or Welsh are limited, although there are some Welsh to Breton materials and dictionaries.

I have been trying to work out which dialect might be the easiest to associate with and learn for someone coming from Wales.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/lucguillou

I come from north brittany near roscoff ferry port. The dialect iI speak is leon. For a long with the priests it was a kind of official dialect as it was the only one in the books.this dialect is the easiest to understand as we prononce the whole words. An example to forget : angobio yn cymraeg. ankounac'had breton forgoten leon: ankounac'hed , kerne (south brittany) ankoued . don't mistake ch (english sh ) and c'h wich sounds like ch cymraeg.Unfortunatly native speakers are dying now there"s a new united language and a new writing too.I can find many similarities but the writing has not the same value in each language..The university of aberystwyth has done a good job about welsh/breton material..I'm also learning welsh and irish from english a wir galon. luc

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Arthfoel

Now I will have to invest more time in finding materials for Leon I think;

yec'hed mat/Iechyd da

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/RomeArBloa

And Cornish sounds like Breton with an English accent ;)

1 year ago