https://www.duolingo.com/galesl

Education: "grado" is not an *educational* degree

In Education, Duolingo translates "degree" from English to Spanish as "grado", and "grado" is translated from Spanish to English as "degree" and "grade".

But in Spanish (Mexican Spanish at least) "grado has nothing to do with education.

Bachelor's degree = licenciatura Master's degree = maestría Doctoral degree/doctorate/PhD = doctorado

Not a "grado" in sight.

As for the grade/mark/score at the end of a course/test etc, here in Mexico it's "nota".

6 years ago

16 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/anamsc
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"Grado" is a degree in Spain (roughly equivalent to a Bachelor's). For example, you can see it used here: http://www.usal.es/webusal/usal_grado_repositorio

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/glamracket

Cheers, it's great to see someone using real-world examples rather than the usual "he (Mexico) says, she (Spain) says" stuff.

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/NgocAnn.

hello

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Gumbee

Titulo is another term I've heard when describing a university degree.

6 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/airandfingers

Shouldn't it be "título"?

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/henryscat
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I think "grado" is also used in an academic context: http://es.wikipedia.org/wiki/Grado_acad%C3%A9mico http://www.upch.edu.pe/faedu/portal/index.php?option=com_content&view=article&id=80&Itemid=218&showall=1 Although I think it is used more in official documents and people would be less likely to use it in conversation, so a less useful term perhaps than the ones suggested here.

6 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ljlkjlkjlkjlk

'grado' is used to mean [academic] "degree" in Ecuador, among (I'm sure) other countries. Spanish varies hugely among different hispanophone countries. A favorite example of mine:

"Although it is a single language, Spanish varies considerably. This befuddles advertisers who would aim to sell to the entire Spanish-speaking world, like the shampoo-maker who discovered that cabello chino (“Chinese hair”) means curly hair in almost all Latin America save Ecuador, where it means straight hair." http://econ.st/11qjkET

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/catcampion

Do/did you live in Ecuador? I ask because I'm planning to move down there in the next two years.

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ljlkjlkjlkjlk

I haven't, I've only visited :)

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/lukecrawford

Calificacion is also common in Mexico to refer to a grade on an exam, homework, etc.

6 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Pablo-Enzo

In Argentina, a graduate (grado) title is one beyond a pre-grad and before a post-grad. For example, analyst and trade degrees are pre-grad, bachelor's and engineering are grad, and doctorates and master's are post-grad.

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/esmith1617

hey, also grado is like grades in primary/high school. 1st grade: primer grado. 2nd grade: segundo grado etc. this is the most common academic use that i have seen for grado. Grades on tests/papers translate to calificaciones or notas.

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/itslem
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I know that in Peruvian Spanish, grado translates to English as degree, but it is degree as in temperature or measurement of angle, not educational degree.

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/nathanlanza

DL seems to use an algorithm that checks if the word has been assigned, and if so it uses it. And it uses it regardless of meaning.

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Huysan
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I'm more peeved that DL uses a picture of voltmeter to illustrate "grado".

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/NgocAnn.

hello

1 year ago
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