https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Soglio

"Nachrichten erscheinen neben Deutsch auch noch auf Englisch."

February 24, 2013

9 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Soglio

Why "neben Deutsch," rather than "auf Deutsch"? And how does "noch" get into it?

February 24, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Menschenkind

Duo's sentence is fine. 'neben' is used for the 'in addition to' part, not to say 'in German'. Maybe: "Alongside German, news are also published in English". It's sort of a construct to name or count things that exist alongside. In addition to gardening, I collect stamps. Alongside a vast majority of men, there were also a few women attending the panel. Does this make any more sense to you?

'noch' isn't absolutely necessary but better when using 'neben', it supports the element of being additional. 'not only x, but also y on top of that'.

February 24, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Soglio

Thank you. That makes much more sense--more sense than the rather tortured English translation does. Would you consider "noch" a modal particle here? (I'm still working on those.)

February 24, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Menschenkind

I found 'to appear' rather odd in the english sentence. In Germany, several newspapers are published daily, sie erscheinen täglich. leo.org knows: frequency of publication – Häufigkeit des Erscheinens (newspaper).

I would consider it a modal particle, yes.

February 24, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Soglio

In English, depending on context, I'd say probably say something like "The news is in both English and in German" or maybe "The English-language news appears next to the German"--assuming that the reference is to a publication in which the two versions are physically next to each other.

February 24, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Menschenkind

Ah, that's the big difference, I assume. The german sentence says nothing about the physical location, 'neben' really only says "in addition" in this kind of usage. I thought of, say, spiegel.de. They mostly publish german news, but alongside they also offer a section with english news. Ihre Artikel erscheinen neben Deutsch teilweise auch auf Englisch – Their articles are to some extent also published in English, alongside German.

In case you wanted to express they're actually printed next to each other, one would be more precisely about what actually is in German or English and use another verb. For example: Neben den deutschen Touristen stand noch eine Gruppe Briten. – There was also a group of british standing next to the german tourists.

February 24, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Soglio

Thanks, that does change things. It sounds like "neben" can have two meanings--analogous to English "beside" versus "besides." "The British tourists stand beside the German tourists" refers to physical location. "There are British tourists besides German tourists" means "in addition to," and has nothing to do with physical location.

So here, the German sentence means that both English-language and German-language news are available, but not necessarily in the same place? For example, they might be on different channels on television, or in different newspapers (but perhaps at the same news stand)?

February 24, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Menschenkind

That's perfect, your description of beside vs. besides is a great match I wasn't aware of, which is rather awkward since it's in the dictionary and even duo at least knew 'beside'.

Absolutely, yes. The sentence says nothing about the location, just the availabilty. It might be different newspapers at the same news stand, different TV shows on the same channel, just as well as a dictionary might offer explanations in german besides english, right on the very same page.

February 24, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Soglio

Thanks for the clarification. It is interesting that the two words--the German and the English--have both meanings, which are not clearly related, despite the fact that there is no common root.

February 25, 2013
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