Duolingo is the most popular way to learn languages in the world. Best of all, it's 100% free!

https://www.duolingo.com/MarshTz

Esperanto: German and Slavic roots.

So after starting Esperanto, I noticed that there are a lot of latin root words (My school requires me to take Spanish). Next year I am going to switch schools, and they offer a german course. I don't want to work on german on here because I will be having classes and I heard that Esperanto is a great way to start learning a language. I don't plan to be fluent but I do want to be somewhat proficient. Anyway, I was wondering what words from Esperanto are taken out of German (and or Slavic) vocabulary.

From what I learned so far all I can see is Hundo (Hund) and Tago (Tag).

I just want to comprise a list of words that can help me when I start my German. (I heard there is very little Slavic roots so that would be cool to know some too.)

1 year ago

13 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/HoeckerCarlos
HoeckerCarlos
  • 25
  • 25
  • 22
  • 19
  • 15
  • 13
  • 12
  • 11
  • 7
  • 5
  • 2
  • 1078

https://www.duolingo.com/MarshTz

Thank you very much! DANKON!

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/mizinamo
mizinamo
  • 20
  • 17
  • 16
  • 14
  • 14
  • 14
  • 13
  • 11
  • 10
  • 10
  • 9
  • 8
  • 8
  • 7
  • 6
  • 6
  • 4
  • 4
  • 4
  • 3
  • 2

Off the top of my head:

Polish: pilko "ball" from something like piłko

Russian: krom "besides" from something like кроме; nepre "definitely" from something like непременно; klopodi "to put effort into trying something" is, I believe, from Russian, though I don't know the etymon.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JasonMey
JasonMey
  • 20
  • 19
  • 7
  • 7
  • 5

The language has hundreds of Germanic roots. About 1/3 of the original root words were Germanic. Many of them are English, but a decent amount are German, including common words like "hejmo" from Heim (home) and "dankon" from danken (thanks). The accusative -n and suffix -in both come from German.

For Slavic, not many words are Slavic, but much of the phonology and structure is Slavic. For example, "plena" is Latin derived, but used in Slavic ways like "plena vortaro" for unabridged dictionary. Also, I was told that the way correlatives are used is decently Slavic.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/BerberuEsperanto

According to my etymology stats, there are: FR 2371 words, EN 2137, IT 2006, DE *1610, (Slavic *1496), LAtin 1369, RU 1277, LiT 1236, PO 845, YID 285, GR 14, ESpan 6, DUTch *3.

(redundant Greek and Spanish not included)

Full document/list: https://web.archive.org/web/20071012022737/http://www.freeweb.hu/etymological/Esperanto.htm

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/salivanto
salivanto
  • 20
  • 13
  • 8
  • 988

If this is for a presentation, then this might be a productive exercise. Otherwise, my advice would be for you to learn as much Esperanto as you can - and start making this list yourself after you start learning German.

Pick an ambitious goal - maybe 10 words per day. In three months you will have learned close to 1000 words. If you've been reading, doing some duolingo, and writing sentences in a course like Lernu kun Logano, you'll be a proper Esperantist at that point. You'll be amazed when you get to your German class how much is familiar - and not just vocabulary.

If you're doing this to motivate yourself, you might be better off just learning some German.

My experience was the other way around. I had minored in German, then a short number of years later, I took up Esperanto. So much of Esperanto was familiar because of my studies of German. I was surprised when people would say there aren't many "German roots" in Esperanto, because I saw them everywhere. It goes well beyond hundo and tago. I still remember the day I was reading something in German and saw an "Esperanto root" there. (German word: abonnieren). German is hiding in words like eldoni (ausgeben). There are tons of words that are both languages take from a common source. One of my favorites is panieren.

The real benefit will be training your mind to think in terms of "prepositions and motion towards." It works the same way in both languages in that the accusative case shows motion towards when used with certain prepositions. Get good at that with Esperanto, that's one less thing to struggle with when you're learning all the extra details about German. (Like how noun gender works here.)

The big thing is, go with your motivation. If you're motivated by German, learn German. If you're enjoying Esperanto and want to see how far you can get before your German classes start, go knock Esperanto out of the park!

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MarshTz

I am motivated to learn German, but I don't want to get ahead of what my teacher will be teaching. Esperanto does go along with the motivation because I know it will be easier to learn. I will follow the advice. Thanks. (By anychance can you explain what you mean by accusative case in german and esperanto? Does the DO also add an n in german?)

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/salivanto
salivanto
  • 20
  • 13
  • 8
  • 988

There's no such thing as getting ahead of your teacher. Having a better foundation will just mean that you'll absorb more of the fine points which are going over the heads of the other students. When I was learning German, my teacher had me skip two semesters and learn with more advanced students - not because I was so awesome, but because the courses I needed weren't being offered that semester. I was dubious but it went great. I'm currently teaching English as a foreign language to a very mixed group. Being slightly ahead of the other students just means you'll ask more interesting questions. Believe me, your teacher will appreciate it - and you'll learn more.

As for what I mean about prepositions and motion in German, you've got to first understand prepositions and motion in Esperanto. I explain it at the marked point in this video. When you feel you've got this down, let me know and I'll explain further.

https://youtu.be/fDR-cZ9cRnk?t=10m18s

By the way, I'm not trying to discourage you from learning Esperanto. Obviously I think Esperanto is great to know and great to know well. I just want to see you make the most of your enthusiasm and the time you have between now and (presumably) September.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MarshTz

I see what you mean. My mom can speak decent German so I do hear it from time to time. I have a couple of German books around. She had tried to teach me when I was younger, but mingling with English people all the time made me not really care to learn it. It does start in September. I think I'll continue learning Esperanto into May (when school ends) then when I have more time I will try German again. German doesn't come easily to me, I heard Esperanto will help. Ich spreche kiene Deutsch (I think that's how you say it?) I have the easy german book which I'm looking at maybe once every two weeks; the weak and strong verbs just make me have a brain fart. Hopefully, Esperanto can help. (p.s I'll look at the video later,( in school)

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Michael.Lubetsky
Michael.Lubetsky
  • 22
  • 21
  • 19
  • 17
  • 16
  • 9
  • 9
  • 9
  • 8
  • 7
  • 395

Off the top of head: German-derived words include knabo (boy, German Knaben), celo (goal, German Ziel (possibly via Polish Cel)), trinki (to drink, German trinken), vintro (winter, from German Winter), frue (early, from German früh)

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MarshTz

Thank you. (I'm pretty sure Jungen is German for boy though).

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/mizinamo
mizinamo
  • 20
  • 17
  • 16
  • 14
  • 14
  • 14
  • 13
  • 11
  • 10
  • 10
  • 9
  • 8
  • 8
  • 7
  • 6
  • 6
  • 4
  • 4
  • 4
  • 3
  • 2

Junge is a German word for "boy".

So is Knabe.

There can be more than one word for a thing, you know :) "big/large, small/little, ...."

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MarshTz

Thanks. I'm shocked that's there isn't a lot of German words.

1 year ago