"Je mange la crêpe."

Translation:I am eating the crepe.

February 24, 2013

79 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/chrissomerry
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Fun fact: Crêpe comes from Old French crespe, from Latin crispus - which is where we get "crisp" and "crispy" from. French uses the little ^ above the vowel to (normally) show where there was once a "s". You see this in château (castle) too. Might help someone, might not, thought I'd bring it up regardless.

August 3, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/LucasHarralson

That deserves a lingot. clap clap clap

March 26, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/TwilightSp3

Interesting !!!

May 20, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/hadao18

Awesome I'd love to learn more

June 23, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/Laneia5

Wow! Where did you learn that?

June 19, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/Crow-Feather

Cool!!!!! Thanks chrissomerry!

June 5, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/coffeybt
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A crepe, the crepe. What's the difference? I understand un/une and le/la/les and their literal translations, but a and the imply one. Which would be the more likely statement "i am eating a crepe" or "i am eating the crepe"? As if there is ever only one crepe, the crepe; you know, the crepe we are all familiar with.

January 11, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/PatrickJaye

@coffeybt

Neither statement is more likely than the other - it depends on the intended meaning.

In this particular case the statement is "je mange la crêpe" - "I am eating the crêpe" - "I am eating the crêpe you made for me" - "the crêpe on my plate" - I am eating the crêpe rather than the sandwich. We are referring to a specific crêpe.

If we are not referring to a specific crêpe then it is "I am eating a crêpe" - "je mange une crêpe".

In this particular example the English and French articles are working in the same way. Unfortunately English and French articles don't always work the same way.

January 11, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/ploup3
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Thank you. That comment is really helpful

July 23, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/derek3x

When the speaker says the sentence at full speed I can never tell if she is saying "une" or "la". Anyone else feel this way?

February 24, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/Sitesurf
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I tend to think that you will make progress in hearing all syllabes and sounds right when you have practiced saying them. My advise would be that you repeat together with the voice, many times, then you will EXPECT the word "la" and then you will hear it. Please try and come back to tell me.

February 25, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/Whitebirde
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Yes, what Sitedurf said is very good advice and i'm doing it my self trying to improve my accent which it did improve a lot using this advice

September 30, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/Whitebirde
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Sitesurf*

September 30, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/Keron

What is Crepe?

March 19, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/Sitesurf
Mod
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You should go to Google Images and see what a crêpe looks like.

March 20, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/bschrock

It's delicious is what it is.

July 3, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/Essar

A flat pancake.

August 3, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/ichbinheidi

I answered "I'm eating pancake" and was rejected :/

February 28, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/Kakkuonhyvaa

It's a very thin cake like thing which you make from milk, flour and egg and cook on a frying pan.

May 25, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/misspiggy12345

It is a flat pancake usually made from wheat flour

September 14, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/nigcry
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A crepe is a pancake.

January 27, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/depan
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This sounded a lot like 'tu' instead of 'je' here. I haven't had this problem before.

July 8, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/InekeSpijk

I have the problem the other way: a lot 'je' instead of 'tu'...

January 31, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/Crow-Feather

Just one? Plus de crepe, s'il vous plait!

June 5, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/honey1292

How do you distinguish from "i eat..." And "i am eating..." They both seem to be "je mange"

October 17, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/Sitesurf
Mod
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"I eat" is simple present, which can be used to express a habit: at breakfast, I (usually) eat cereals.

"I am eating" is continuous present, which expresses the fact that the event is in progress at the time I speak: right now, I am eating cereals.

In French, there is no "continuous" tense as verbal form. So both "I eat" and "I am eating" generally translate to simple present "je mange".

However, if you want to express that the action is in progress now, you can use "je suis en train de manger" (I am in the process of eating).

October 18, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/kaitlin_0

Why wouldnt you put 'de la' ?

January 7, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/PatrickJaye

@kaitlin

"De la" is the feminine partitive article - that means it expresses an unspecified amount of a feminine non-countable noun.

"Crêpes" are countable. So if we were eating "a crêpe" or "crêpes" it would be "une crêpe" or "des crêpes".

However in this particular case we are eating "the crêpe" - the specific crêpe on our plate. So we use the definite article "la".

January 7, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/Kiva_XXIII

I understand your argument in terms of grammar, but a literal translation of the French definite article (and articles are used much less, and differently, in English) yields a sentence in English which I believe cannot be made sense of without context. What plate? Is it "the crepe" as opposed to some other food item? As opposed to some other crepe? Is there an argument over who will eat a specific crepe? I believe there should be more flexibility when interpreting a stand-alone sentence such as this. However, this is the second time this has happened to me so far, implying it is a "thing" on this site, and I intend to let the matter rest here.

July 16, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/PatrickJaye

@Kiva_XXIII

You are right we can not fully understand this sentence without context. That is true of both the French sentence and the English translation.

The French sentence is referring to a particular crêpe. We have to read it as part of a larger conversation where the context is made clear. Maybe it is one crêpe rather than another, maybe it is the crêpe rather than some other specific food item previously mentioned etc. However the English translation is no more lacking in context than the French original. It is exactly the same.

In this particular case a literal translation of the definite article is the only option - it is not just a DL thing.

If we translated it as "I am eating a crêpe" - that might be a more satisfying stand alone sentence but it is clearly not what the French original means.

July 16, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/MariaCatal143163

I found the translation for "crepe" as something that goes to the funeral with... the little black piece as a mourning sign... why eating it?

March 14, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/KateSimpson0

It's just a homonym, Crepe refers here to a food, sort of like a thin pancake.

March 16, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/Riya263356

Crepe- A pancake

April 5, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/Nery96038

That was the translation I used and it was wrong :(

July 25, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/mila144526

Yes French has past present and future tenses but it does not have any continuous tenses which is what the comment was about.

March 19, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/AmarachiAn3

How do you say "i eat crepes" in french ?

July 7, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/Sitesurf
Mod
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Je mange des crêpes.

July 8, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/Aubrey595187

I accidentally pressed woman instead of crêpe.

January 21, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/Ondk6

Crêpe is pancake

February 4, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/Sitesurf
Mod
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No, it is not. Go to Google images and take a good look.

February 4, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/AsmitChaud

Why does it have to be 'the crêpe' not 'a crêpe'?

February 7, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/Shonntrell

Why can't I say "I eat a crepe"? I put that and got it wrong.

February 19, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/rajashekar223854

when to use du and de.

March 16, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/Jackie_R17

How do you know when to add the "s" in "manger" ? for example: Je mange , Je manges ?

June 18, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/Sitesurf
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In English, only 3rd person singular changes with an -s ending. In French, the ending changes with almost every person:

je mange, tu manges, il/elle/on mange, nous mangeons, vous mangez (polite singular and plural), ils/elles mangent

June 18, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/Kiersthara

I'm curious why the English version of the word doesn't have the accent on it. Since it's a traditionally French food, and we don't have our own word for it, just stripping out the accent to anglicize it seems vaguely rude...?

September 1, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/Winter_Wulf

All accents get stripped out from every language - just like any letters or symbols that don't exist in our language. Although people don't normally get worked up when you use the accents, you can't expect the fundamentals of English grammar or the English alphabet to be changed just because another language is different and has them.

September 23, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/Sebastian.va

how will i get to know whether crêpe is plural or singular when they speak.......

October 6, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/Sitesurf
Mod
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Focus on determiners, articles in particular:

la crêpe (sing) = LAH

les crêpes (plur) = LEH

October 6, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/Kingofderby

I don't understand why Pancake is not an acceptable translation. That is what we call them.

October 21, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/Sitesurf
Mod
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Not really, because it is not the same food. Go to Google pictures to see what a crêpe is.

October 22, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/MaggiePye
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Except that French-speaking people will also call a pancake (an American-style pancake, I mean), "une crêpe." At least, the people (and the restaurants) in Québec do. A crepe and a pancake are different (though similar) things in English, but in my experience, both of them are translated by "une crêpe" in French--which makes that possibly not the best choice for a translation exercise.

January 25, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/UrviPatel4

Why is it said as "I am eating THE crêpe" yet the "the" is excluded in other sentences?

September 1, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/Sitesurf
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Because it is intended that this crêpe is specific: not "a crepe", not "one crepe", not "any crepe", but THE crepe - already mentioned or displayed on the table...

September 2, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/omnibusFX

Need help people. This is getting confusing. When does one use 'du', 'de' or 'de la' when performing an action like drinking or eating. ex: Je mange du pain, Je bois de l'eau and je bois de la beire.

September 25, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/Sitesurf
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bread, water and beer are mass nouns (uncountable things).

When you eat or drink (or perform any action on) something you cannot count, the action is performed on "an undetermined quantity of a mass thing".

In English, you can say "I eat bread" or "I eat some bread", the meaning is the same.

In French, with that meaning, a partitive article is required (tip: "partitive" = part of something).

  • if the mass thing is masculine and starts with a consonant sound, you will use "du"
  • if the mass thing is feminine and starts with a consonant sound, you will use "de la"
  • if the mass thing starts with a vowel sound, you will use "de l'".
September 26, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/Y0K1

Would "je mange de la crêpe" be grammatically correct? If so, what's the difference to "je mange la crêpe"?

October 16, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/Sitesurf
Mod
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Grammatically, it is correct, now the meaning would be that you are just eating a mouthful from a crêpe.

Je mange la crêpe = I eat the crêpe: it is a specific crêpe and I eat it all.

October 17, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/JankiJasan

Why do we need 'the'

October 25, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/KateSimpson0

Because we are talking about a specific crepe.

November 16, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/ronnierb17
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Why not "Je mange de la crêpe"?

January 25, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/Sitesurf
Mod
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"une crêpe, des crêpes" is a countable noun

January 25, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/ronnierb17
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So we say: Je mange du riz, because rice is non-count. Right?

January 29, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/Sitesurf
Mod
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Right.

January 29, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/BilingualPony

Doesn't mange mean eat or is eating

September 25, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/Sitesurf
Mod
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"je mange" means "I eat" or "I am eating".

September 26, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/_DatOneMCR1

Shouldn't it be "I am eating A crepe?"

December 21, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/Sitesurf
Mod
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A crepe = UNE crêpe

THE crepe = LA crêpe

December 21, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/1lQA6

Why does it matter if i say i am eating a crepe? My french teacher told me it's the same thing, and she spent most of her life in france!

December 28, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/Sitesurf
Mod
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These are very basic notions about definite and indefinite articles.

If you understand the difference in English between "the crepe" and "a crepe", you need to know how to translate each meaning to French.

December 28, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/TheDoctorLies

I accidentally did "I am eating a crepe". Oops!

August 22, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/isaacCasti17

Translation is wrong so it might be confusign for us. Its diferent to say "i eat" than "i am eating" because they are different tenses.

September 8, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/PatrickJaye

@isaacCasti17

The French sentence "Je mange la crêpe" can translate to either "I eat the crepe" or "I am eating the crepe".

French does not have a continuous tense. The French simple present therefore translates to both the English simple present and continuous present.

Which one to use will depend on context - in a real life situation it will usually be clear which is intended.

September 8, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/Dylan128205

The French, as far as I know, have past and present tense.

September 21, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/PatrickJaye

@Dylan128205

Yes French has past, present and future tenses but it doesn't have any continuous tenses which is what the comment was about ;)

September 21, 2016
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