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"La señora es conocida."

Translation:The lady is known.

4 years ago

31 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/MikalDunn

I should have known that: "The lady is cooked", while a correct translation of "La señora es cocinada", nevertheless required a reread of the question.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/joyrajd
joyrajd
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Yo también..."conocida" vs "cocinada"

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Dee811953

This is too funny

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Heftan

Totally

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SqueezeboxSarah

A few of us have had this problem at the start of this lesson...

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Dominic-Lawrence

Yup, totally just made that mistake and slapped my forehead. d'oh

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Pieter198825

Same here!

8 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/yogeshbatra

that's good i am not the only one got confused

3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/lynettemcw
lynettemcwPlus
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It only makes sense. I am often doing a double take because I misread something in English in a funny way, and I have been reading English for almost 60 years and speaking it for over 60 years. Of course you are going to do that un a language I am less familiar with. As long as you know know how to find the error after you double take (and are wise enough to double take before you enter your answer, you are fine.

Cocinar = cocin+ado/a

Conocer = conoc+ido/a

Both are standard past participle/adjective constructions using the root verb. But beyond the different root, the different vowel in the ending (ida not ada) will also help you notice the difference as you get more advanced

3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Talca
Talca
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conocido/a can translate as "famous" too. Duo accepts it.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/rogercchristie
rogercchristie
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The lady is well-known is OK. That's sort of famous - or infamous, depending on what she is well-known for!

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Evelyn-Grace

sort of, known is different from famous. You can be known about in your town but you are not famous, at least not outside of your town. hope this helps (:

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Kekistanese
Kekistanese
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Well, she's famous, not just nationally or globally. But she's famous in the town. For example: "my bully is a football player, he is very famous in my high school.... my life suck!" ^0^ !!!

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SMAGringo

So, in an earlier question they use "conocido/a" as "acquaintance", now you lose a heart for using that word....grrrrr

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/tu.8zPhLD72zzoZN
tu.8zPhLD72zzoZN
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There would have been an article if it were meant as "acquaintance" as it is not a job or profession and would be like the word for friend. "La señora es una conocida."

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/GregIhnen

+1

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JiteshDevadiga

Can someone provide a context where this sentence is used?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Silent-Hill

That woman looks suspicious. Don't worry, she is known by security.
That woman just took something without asking. Don't worry she is known by the manager of the store. Did you see that woman last night kissing all those men? Yeah, she is known to do that quite often, some could say in fact, she is known by the whole town, if you catch my drift.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JiteshDevadiga

I do catch the drift. Just that the sentence alone sounds a bit tacky, unless you give more information like you did above

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/YoSoyNachoLibre

My first guess was "The woman is cooking" this would of been more culturally relevant jajajajaja Regressar a la cocina!

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/HarpoChico

She is a legend in her own mind...

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/rrwithers
rrwithers
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Should, and usually does, allow contractions

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/lynettemcw
lynettemcwPlus
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I am sure what contractions you are referring to. In this sentence no contraction makes sense. If you said lady's that would be possessive not a contraction of lady and is.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/astillion
astillion
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ma'am....

9 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/nitishborade

why is ma'am not accepted - "The ma'am is known"?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/lynettemcw
lynettemcwPlus
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The word ma'am is a contraction for madam and is only used for direct address not third party reference. Just as you address a man as Sir but don't refer to "the Sir over there", you would not make a reference to a ma'am. And of course Madam as third party reference is somewhat limited to Maitre D's and such in popular usage. This is, of course, American usage. British usage may very somewhat as I have heard more references to people using what I would consider a word of address only, but I can not speak to that. But Duo is based on American English.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Ruby202951

The Mrs. Is cooked?? I didn't get that at all

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/lynettemcw
lynettemcwPlus
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Conocida is a predicate adjective derived from the past participle of the verb conocer to know (generally a person) If you actually wanted to say The lady is cooked that would be La señora es cocinada. This again is an adjective derived from the past participle but the verb is cocinar to cook.

The Mrs is not a valid translation for La señora, as it's usage is much different. Señor and Señora were originally more like the titles Lord and Lady. They show respect. So Señora has become a respectful way of talking about a woman whether you know their marital status or not. But in English the Mrs is said only by a man about his wife or to a man about his wife. If I, as a woman, said "I saw the Mrs on the street" to another woman or an unmarried man, it would not make sense (except I guess if I were gay) . I do not believe that Spanish speaking men refer to their wives as La señora.

Forgive me if I am stepping on a joke, but just in case you actually don't understand I do tend to try to explain.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/PatriekVro
PatriekVro
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Why would "mistress" not be a good answer, in stead of "Mrs." ?

7 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/lynettemcw
lynettemcwPlus
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Actually neither Mrs or mistress is a particularly good translation for señora here. Both señor and señora are used commonly to refer people. The closest translationa are probably Gentleman and lady, but Man or woman makes more sense than using the Me or Mrs type definition of the words. Of course the other issue is the confusion with the word mistress where it can mean kept woman.

7 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/davidrosa.tt

pero papá la amo a ella..... por eso que no puedo casarme con ella?????..................... papa: porque la senora es conocida

4 years ago