"Ich habe einen Nachbarn, dessen Hund laut ist."

Translation:I have a neighbor whose dog is loud.

March 7, 2017

24 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/Acedave123

Wasn't paying attention and put 'I have a dog whose neighbor is loud'

January 7, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/az_p
Mod

    :D

    And how would you translate that?

    March 28, 2018

    https://www.duolingo.com/jairapetyan

    "...dessen Hund" means it is a female dog (I thought masculine nouns would become "deren Hund")?

    Sometimes I think I might be "getting" cases, other times I think it will never happen.

    May 26, 2019

    https://www.duolingo.com/-Copernicus-

    Which pronoun you use depends on the antecedent ("einen Nachbarn"), not the dog. Just like you would say "Ich habe einen Nachbarn, der eine Katze hat," with "der" agreeing with "Nachbarn" (gender-wise, anyway), "dessen" agrees with "Nachbarn," not "Hund."

    Also, it looks like you've got "dessen" and "deren" mixed up. "Dessen" is for masculine (and neuter) nouns, and "deren" is for feminine (and plural).

    May 26, 2019

    https://www.duolingo.com/Uberling

    Hmm. Why is it "Nachbarn"? I thought neighbor singular was "Nachbar" and that "Nachbarn" was plural.

    March 7, 2017

    https://www.duolingo.com/MySecrecy

    I think it's because of the case. I am German and this sentence is definitely right. But as of right now the answer to your question doesn't come into my mind. Sorry for that, but I'll think about it....

    March 7, 2017

    https://www.duolingo.com/Uberling

    Ah. So just like "Prinz" or "Elefant" in the nominative become "Prinzen" or "Elefanten" in the accusative, so "Nachbar" becomes "Nachbarn," perhaps?

    March 7, 2017

    https://www.duolingo.com/az_p
    Mod

      Yes, it can be a weak noun.

      Source: Canoo.net

      March 7, 2017

      https://www.duolingo.com/MySecrecy

      Yes, exactly :)

      March 8, 2017

      https://www.duolingo.com/KeithinJP

      i have a neighbor that has a noisy dog. Should also be accepted.

      June 20, 2017

      https://www.duolingo.com/JAVillaverde

      The programm accepts "I have a neighbor, whose dog is noisy".

      July 8, 2017

      https://www.duolingo.com/Doctor-John

      Loud and noisy are similar but different concepts. A dog could be loud or noisy or both. In the absence of more information, "loud" is more likely to be the right translation.

      December 16, 2018

      https://www.duolingo.com/az_p
      Mod

        It's not similar enough grammatically to be the closest translation. That would be Ich habe einen Nachbarn, der einen lauten Hund hat.

        March 28, 2018

        https://www.duolingo.com/JeanniKistler

        This one already hadthe answer in full on the screen before i could do the excercise! This happens to ne frequentky. Why does it do this?

        October 22, 2017

        https://www.duolingo.com/az_p
        Mod

          No idea! You could help Duolingo's programmers figure it out by reporting it as a bug. Screenshots help, too.

          March 28, 2018

          https://www.duolingo.com/RubenArmen3

          Is this a real sentence, i.e. do Germans talk like that?

          April 3, 2017

          https://www.duolingo.com/az_p
          Mod

            Sure! There are other ways to phrase such a topic, but this sentence sounds totally normal.

            March 28, 2018

            https://www.duolingo.com/hud214

            Apparently this sentence doesn't mean "I have a neighbor who has a loud dog." When it says "Ich habe Hunger." stick with "I have hunger." When will I ever learn?!

            May 25, 2017

            https://www.duolingo.com/az_p
            Mod

              When translating:

              1. Does a word-for-word translation sound natural? If so, use it. If not,
              2. Does a translation using the same grammatical construction and vocabulary sound natural? If so, use it. If not,
              3. Does a sentence with the same vocabulary sound natural if you modify the grammar? If so, use it. If not,
              4. Is the sentence idiomatic? Is there an equivalent idiom in the target language? If so, use it. If not,
              5. You've discovered that not everything has a simple translation! Good luck figuring out how to say it :P
              March 28, 2018

              https://www.duolingo.com/hud214

              So, you think "I have a neighbor who has a loud dog." and "I have a neighbor whose dog is loud." mean different things? Pray tell what would the difference be? The word "negligible" comes to mind.

              March 28, 2018

              https://www.duolingo.com/Arkhaeaeon

              Why do the genitive forms take an additional -en suffix, whereas all other relative pronouns use the definite article as the relative pronoun?

              March 23, 2019

              https://www.duolingo.com/mizinamo

              I don't think there is an answer to "why".

              March 24, 2019

              https://www.duolingo.com/beast1302000

              Dessen vs deren vs denen? ;-;

              June 1, 2019

              https://www.duolingo.com/mizinamo

              dessen is the genitive form of der (masculine) or das (neuter): Ich habe einen Hund, dessen Fell lang ist. Ich habe ein Pferd, dessen Fell lang ist.

              deren is the genitive form of die (feminine or plural): Ich habe eine Katze, deren Fell lang ist. Ich habe drei Tiere, deren Fell lang ist.

              denen is the dative form: Ich habe drei Hunde, denen ich immer gutes Futter gebe. Ich habe drei Katzen, denen ich immer gutes Futter gebe. Ich habe drei Pferde, denen ich immer gutes Futter gebe.

              June 2, 2019
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